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Wichita Falls

WaggonerRanch.com

A couple hours northwest of Fort Worth, the Waggoner Ranch is up for sale. The legendary, half-million-acre ranch near Wichita Falls has a history almost as big as its $725 million price tag. KERA’s Justin Martin talks with Eric O’Keefe of the Land Report about the ranch’s outsized legacy. 

Ben Noey, Jr. / The Fort Worth Star-Telegram

A North Texas city has stopped using treated toilet water to supplement its water supply after a catastrophic drought was followed by heavy springtime rains.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Mother Nature has pretty much drowned the Texas drought.

That’s clear from color-coded maps just released from the U.S. Drought Monitor.

United Regional Healthcare System / (Facebook)

The pilot involved in a helicopter crash in Wichita Falls on Saturday claims it “spun out of control” before it crashed a few blocks from United Regional Health Care System.

Bob Daemmrich / Marjorie Kamys Cotera / The Texas Tribune

Five stories that have North Texas talking: President Obama makes a quick stop in Dallas to meet with local leaders; two facilities for the 2,000 unaccompanied immigrant children coming to Dallas County aren’t ready; Wichita Falls begins recycling wastewater; and more.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Wichita Falls could soon become the first in the country where half of the drinking water comes directly from wastewater.

Yes, that includes water from toilets. For some citizens, that's a little tough to swallow.

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In today's All Things Considered local block from the KERA Newsroom: Wichita Falls, 2 hours northwest of Fort Worth, may become the first city to use wastewater as drinking water. We’ll hear from Shelley Kofler about that process. And what would you say to the person who tried to kill you? New York Times columnist Anand Giridharadas was on Think today to share how Rais Bhuiyan faced his attacker, a white supremacist named Mark Stroman.

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Lou Reed, the punk-poet of rock ‘n’ roll, died Sunday. He was 71. He died from an ailment related to a recent liver transplant.

Reed was leader of the 1960s cult band Velvet Underground. He later became a solo performer. He influenced generations of musicians from David Bowie and R.E.M. to Talking Heads and Sonic Youth.

He was a legendary musician – and legendary for being a difficult interviewee. But KERA’s Jerome Weeks turned around a nice radio piece in 2010 about Reed, focusing on his photography. Many of his landscape pictures were on display at the Wichita Falls Museum of Art at Midwestern State University.