water | KERA News

water

More people in Texas drink from water systems that are in violation of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act than any other state in the country,  according to a new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council.

Updated 5:35 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is moving to roll back an environmental rule intended to define which small bodies of water are subject to federal authority under the Clean Water Act.

Texas Must Increase Water Conservation Efforts, Report Says

May 19, 2016
Photo Illustration By Todd Wiseman/Ed Scipul / Texas Tribune

Most water utilities in Texas need to "substantially increase" their conservation efforts, according to a recent review of more than 300 city utilities by the Texas Living Waters Project, a consortium of environmental groups.

Courtney Collins / KERA news

The Dallas County community where about 100 people live without running water or sewer service has been approved to operate a water supply corporation-- a step toward bringing services there.

Shutterstock

Update: More than 150 Dallas school district employees had their blood tested for lead on Friday.

Joost Nelissen / flickr

About 500 Dallas school district employees have to move out of the building they work in. That’s because small amounts of lead and other substances were found in the water there.

Shutterstock

Lead contamination caused a crisis with the water supply in Flint, Michigan. But the CDC says at least 4 million households have children living in them that are being exposed to high levels of lead.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Some communities hover over the financial edge, while others have completely fallen off. Sandbranch, an unincorporated corner of Dallas County, is one of them. Residents there have no internet, no trash pickup and no running water. 

Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

Disagreeing with Dallas-Fort Worth-area water officials, the Texas Water Development Board decided on Wednesday that a years-long conflict over a yet-to-be-built reservoir in the region’s 50-year water plan is serious enough that it should be resolved.

Flickr.com

 The drought’s over for now, but not statewide needs for more water. The Texas Water Development Board votes Thursday (7/23) on loans for projects that address future needs in the state’s water plan. Nine of the 21 applications came from North Texas.

Jeff Walker, Deputy Executive Administrator for the Water Supply and Infrastructure Division of the Texas Water Development Board, says the North Texas projects range from a six-figure wastewater system improvement to a $440 million pipeline project.

City of Plano

A 30-year-old water tower no longer serves as a Plano landmark after a demolition crew "tipped" the structure Monday morning. 

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Texas is facing drought and a booming population. There's a unique project in North Texas that hopes to meet the state's growing thirst for water: A wetland. Wastewater flows through the wetland, where plants clean the water.

Commentary: The Tumbleweeds Are Back

Sep 4, 2014
Shutterstock

Don’t let the recent rains fool you. We’re still in drought and commentator David Marquis says there’s no reason to get comfortable.

Bunch o Balloons/Kickstarter

Five stories that have North Texas talking: a Plano man generates national buzz for his water balloon invention; legalizing gay marriage in Texas would generate $182 million in economic impact; David Sedaris is coming back to Dallas; and more.

Study Up For 'Think': Drought in the South

Jul 7, 2014
Anne Worner / flickr

Texas is big, hot and thirsty for water. Today on Think at 1 p.m., conservationist Ken Kramer and Jody Puckett, director of water utilities for the City of Dallas, join Krys Boyd to discuss the courses of action the state can take to combat the continued water shortage.

Shutterstock

It’s natural to sweat more in summer, but also dangerous if you’re not careful. In this edition of KERA's consumer health series, Vital Signs, Dr. Alexander Eastman, Interim Medical Director of Trauma at Parkland Hospital,  explains how to guard against dehydration.

Ann Worthy/Shutterstock

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Some Texas cities only have 45-day water supplies; how effective is Texas’ death penalty?; the most popular baby names in Texas; and more.

Mark Graham / Texas Tribune

A Republican running for Wendy Davis’ state senate seat wants to consider changes to the $2 billion fund that lawmakers created to finance water projects. Voters approved the fund when they adopted Proposition 6 last fall.

David Chong / KERA News

When real estate developer Don Huffines narrowly defeated John Carona, Dallas County’s long-serving state senator, in the Republican primary, he promised to take a conservative, tea party approach to issues in Austin. 

Shutterstock

Dehydration happens when your body doesn’t have enough water to replace what’s lost during the day. You might associate that more with activity and heat. But Dr. Alexander Eastman, Interim Trauma Medical Director at Parkland Hospital, explains in this week’s installment of Vital Signs how dehydration can be a serious problem in winter.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

A million-dollar campaign by a political action committee and support from top elected officials helped grease the wheels for passage of Proposition 6, which creates a $2 billion fund to finance water projects.

Wikimedia Commons

The lawmaker who sponsored the Proposition 6 water legislation on the Nov. 5 ballot is defending it from criticism leveled by a former state water board executive and a candidate for governor.

Wikimedia Commons

Top elected officials across the state are campaigning hard for Proposition 6, which would create a $2 billion fund to finance water projects.  But opponents claim the constitutional amendment on the Nov. 5 ballot is just a slush fund. 

Erik Hersman / (cc) flickr

The Nov. 5 ballot in front of Texas voters includes nine measures that would change the state constitution. 

The most publicized issue would take $2 billion from the state’s Rainy Day Fund to help finance water projects.

Gov. Rick Perry inspected the water levels at Lake Travis and then urged voters to approve proposition 6, the water project funding program that would pay for the next 50 years of water projects in the state that is up for a vote on this November's ballot.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Texas House Speaker Joe Straus is traveling the state, rallying support for an election measure that will pay for water projects.

Flickr.com

State environmental commissioners have approved crucial permits for Lake Ralph Hall in Fannin County.

BJ Austin / KERA News

UPDATE, Wed. 11:45am:  Water service in Grand Prairie returned to normal sooner than city officials anticipated. They had expected full service to be restored Thursday, three days after the major pipeline rupture. But the city's Amy Sprinkles credits swift and smooth repair and cut-backs in water use by residents with today's return to business as usual.

"We've got the water back on, flowing through the line," Sprinkles said. "We tested it, everything held. We got the water disinfected and we are filling the water tanks today. We are back to regular operations in Grand Prairie." 

Original story:

Grand Prairie officials say things should be back to normal Thursday after a major water main break threatened to leave the city high and dry for a couple of days.  The city's warning that the water could be shut-off sent residents scurrying to stock up.

A new study of 100 private water wells in and near the Barnett Shale showed elevated levels of potential contaminants such as arsenic, according to a team of researchers led by UT Arlington.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

After more than six years in court that cost more than $6 million the Tarrant Regional Water District’s legal battle with the State of Oklahoma has ended.

Pages