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veterans

One ad for a 2018 congressional candidate shows him wearing a T-shirt with an unofficial Marine Corps motto, "Pain is weakness leaving the body." Another ad shows a candidate boasting, "I was the first woman Marine to fly in an F-18 in combat. And I got to land on aircraft carriers."

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Decades after the U.S. government exposed service members to chemical weapons in secret experiments, lawmakers have advanced a measure intended to make it easier for those World War II veterans to obtain compensation. The bill, known as the Arla Harrell Act, advanced to President Trump's desk after Senate approval Wednesday.

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It's been a tough week for the transgender community. The Texas Senate passed a so-called bathroom bill regulating public restroom use for transgender Texans. The next day, President Trump tweeted that he'd like to ban transgender people from serving in the military.  

When a former service member needs a service dog to help with a visual, hearing or mobility issue, the Department of Veterans Affairs helps pay for it. But that’s not the case for veterans who use service dogs to help them cope with post-traumatic stress disorder.

House lawmakers yesterday announced bipartisan agreement on legislation to boost college aid for veterans. If passed, it would be the largest expansion of the GI Bill in nearly a decade. 

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A towering oak tree draped with Spanish moss offers little relief from the Florida sun as Andrew Lumish scrubs grime from the headstone of a World War I veteran.

"It's pretty messy, pretty dirty," he says. "We're pulling out dirt and biological material that's been here since 1921. So, a lot of elbow grease here."

Lumish, who has so far cleaned about 600 veterans' headstones, says he restores them out of respect for those who died and to learn about how they lived.

Almost half a million veterans gained health care coverage during the first two years of the Affordable Care Act, a report finds.

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SalFalko

Returning to civilian live is no easy task for members of the military; a difficult transition can land a veteran in trouble. North Texas Judge John Roach has come up with a one-of-a-kind way to reach those vets: He’s taking his court on the road.

In Boston, the organizers of the annual St. Patrick's Day parade say they are reconsidering a decision to ban a group for gay veterans, following a public backlash.

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For those leaving the military, readjusting to civilian life can be a rocky transition. For veterans or families of veterans, trying to juggle college classes and homework assignments on top of that can be frustrating.

 

The Senate voted 100-0 on Monday to confirm President Trump's nominee to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs, Dr. David Shulkin.

The unanimous vote makes Shulkin the first-ever nonveteran to lead the VA, but that didn't stop him from winning endorsements from most of the major veterans service organizations. He also won bipartisan, unanimous support from the Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs — a political double rainbow in Washington's current polarized atmosphere.

As promised, President Trump has moved to dismantle the Affordable Care Act. It's a concern for those who might be left without health insurance — and especially for the Department of Veterans Affairs, which may have to pick up some of the slack.

Carrie Farmer, a health policy researcher at the Rand Corp., says 3 million vets who are enrolled in the VA usually get their health care elsewhere — from their employer, or maybe from Obamacare exchanges. If those options go away, she has no idea just how many of those 3 million veterans will move over to the VA.

Lawmakers to Examine Ballooning Cost Of Tuition Program For Texas Veterans Tuesday

Sep 12, 2016
The Texas Tribune

State university leaders have long complained about what they call an underfunded mandate to provide an increasing number of veterans and their dependents a free college education under the Hazlewood Act

STEPHANIE KUO

In 2004, Steve Papania was patrolling Kirkuk, Iraq, as a rifleman in the U.S. Army. He’d enlisted immediately after 9/11.

Transportation Issues Hinder DFW Veterans, Report Says

Mar 29, 2016
Lain Yandahi / Texas Tribune

For many North Texas veterans, lack of transportation is one of the main impediments to accessing services, getting medical care or holding jobs, according to an extensive survey released Tuesday by a coalition of nonprofits that serve veterans in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

In 2008, Army Reserve Capt. LeRoy Torres returned home to Robstown, Texas, after a tour in Iraq. He went back to work as a state trooper with the Texas Highway Patrol.

Torres was a longtime runner. So when a suspect took off on foot one morning, Torres sprinted after him. But something was wrong. A burning sensation in his chest hurt so bad, it almost knocked him down.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

It’s common to train service dogs to help veterans with physical disabilities. But how about helping them with post traumatic stress disorder? The Veterans Administration is launching a major study to find out what effect specially-trained service dogs can have on a veterans ability to cope with life after service. Veterans who already rely on service dogs say the research should have been done years ago.

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World War II was a massive undertaking, a war fought on many fronts across half the world. Even with the draft, the government needed more soldiers. So every branch of the American military launched women’s units to aid in the effort.

Here in Pall Mall, Tenn., you can walk up on the front porch of the Forbus General Store, est. 1892, and still hear Alvin C. York's rich Tennessee accent.

Every day, the older neighbors gather on the store's front porch.

"My grandfather used to cut Sgt. Alvin York's hair," Richard West recalls. "He would pay a quarter. He was a big man, redheaded."

Veteran Unemployment Improving, But Unequally

Nov 10, 2015
Kim Adams

Unemployment rates for veterans have improved since last year, and they remain better than overall unemployment. The latest numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show unemployment for veterans is nearly a full percentage point better than non-veterans the same age.

But some groups of vets are having better luck finding jobs than others.

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Two North Texas nonprofits are teaming up to make the dream of home ownership a reality for a local veteran.

For this 55-year-old and his young daughter, a new house is the high point in a decade that’s been marked with despair.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Veterans face many challenges when looking for work after leaving the military.

Dallas is one of the cities the Department of Veterans Affairs has chosen for a new program engineered to improve veteran hiring. North Texas companies are already on the job.

This week, NPR reported that the Department of Veterans Affairs failed to live up to a promise to contact 4,000 veterans who were exposed to mustard gas in secret military experiments. In 1993, the VA promised it would reach out to each of those veterans to let them know that they were eligible for disability benefits. Instead, over the past 20 years, the VA reached out to only 610.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Hundreds of military veterans have taken over the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in Dallas for the National Wheelchair Games this week. Some are novices just out of rehab; others are Paralympians.

And at this competition, it’s all about the wheels.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Saturday is the 71st anniversary of D-Day. That’s when Allied troops stormed the shores of Normandy, in a turning point battle that claimed almost 20,000 lives on both sides.

Two veterans now living in Fort Worth weren’t on that bloody beach in France, but their memories of World War II are indelible.

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Every year, volunteers across the country pick a single night at the end of January to count the homeless. A report was released Tuesday about the results in Dallas and Collin counties.

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United States Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert McDonald was in Dallas Monday to launch the Veterans Economic Communities Initiative, a nationwide effort aimed at increasing education, employment and other re-entry opportunities for veterans.

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