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Tuition

Universities Face Funding Cuts Of 6 Percent To 10 Percent In Senate Plan

Mar 16, 2017
Illustration by Todd Wiseman / The Texas Tribune

A Senate committee on Wednesday voted to significantly rework how universities in Texas are funded — a move that will save some smaller regional schools from catastrophic cuts but instead spread significant losses more evenly among all the public colleges in the state. 

Marjorie Kamys Cotera/The Texas Tribune

In his most aggressive terms yet, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick excoriated Texas universities for raising their tuition in recent years, suggesting that the Texas Senate will try to limit tuition growth when it reconvenes next year. 

When Andrea Diaz was applying to colleges, she got good news and bad news. The good news was that American University, a private four-year university in Washington, D.C., wanted her. The bad news was that it required her to come to campus early to take two summer developmental-level courses in math and English.

"I was traumatized by it," Diaz says, "because I felt that they didn't see in me the potential to do well in college."

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Texas legislators are debating whether to repeal the Texas Dream Act. Signed by then-Governor Rick Perry in 2001, the law allows certain undocumented students to pay in-state tuition. A recent Texas Tribune analysis revealed that the majority of undocumented students who pay in-state tuition rates don't attend four-year universities – they’re in community colleges. And most are in school here in North Texas.

Dianna Douglas / KERA News

One of the guests at President Obama's State of Union address was a North Texan who's a college student but isn’t a legal resident. She illustrates the current debate over what benefits the U.S. should offer undocumented immigrants, especially those who were brought here as children. One such benefit that is currently under fire in Texas is in-state college tuition.

Mark Graham/Cooper Neil / The Texas Tribune

The candidates for governor are back on the campaign trail after mixing it up in their first debate Friday night. On Saturday Democrat Wendy Davis sat for an hour-long interview in Austin. Republican Greg Abbott stayed in the Rio Grande Valley, hoping to attract Latino votes.

Bob Booth / Fort Worth Star-Telegram

In Fort Worth Thursday, State Sen. Leticia Van De Putte, the Democrat running for lieutenant governor, rolled out her plan to provide a free, two-year college education to all qualified high school graduates.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

This year, Texas became the second state in the nation offering fixed-rate tuition for students attending state colleges or universities. That means a freshman’s tuition won’t rise for four years. And that's something students applaud.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Governor Rick Perry is putting new pressure on universities to contain tuition and graduate more students.

Governor Perry will be in Dallas Monday to promote his plan for making college more affordable. But some universities think his plan is a one way street.

Gage Skidmore / flickr

Rick Perry wants to use money left over from his failed presidential bid to form a political action committee supporting other candidates.

Perry's campaign has written to the Federal Election Commission asking about forming a PAC or super PAC.

A PAC would allow Perry to raise up to $5,000 from individual donors. Super PACs don't impose contribution limits.

The letter says Perry raised $270,000 for the general presidential election and now is asking donors if that money can be transferred to a PAC since he didn't win the Republican nomination.