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Tuition

Universities Face Funding Cuts Of 6 Percent To 10 Percent In Senate Plan

Mar 16, 2017
Illustration by Todd Wiseman / The Texas Tribune

A Senate committee on Wednesday voted to significantly rework how universities in Texas are funded — a move that will save some smaller regional schools from catastrophic cuts but instead spread significant losses more evenly among all the public colleges in the state. 

When Andrea Diaz was applying to colleges, she got good news and bad news. The good news was that American University, a private four-year university in Washington, D.C., wanted her. The bad news was that it required her to come to campus early to take two summer developmental-level courses in math and English.

"I was traumatized by it," Diaz says, "because I felt that they didn't see in me the potential to do well in college."

Bob Booth / Fort Worth Star-Telegram

In Fort Worth Thursday, State Sen. Leticia Van De Putte, the Democrat running for lieutenant governor, rolled out her plan to provide a free, two-year college education to all qualified high school graduates.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Governor Rick Perry is putting new pressure on universities to contain tuition and graduate more students.

Governor Perry will be in Dallas Monday to promote his plan for making college more affordable. But some universities think his plan is a one way street.

Gage Skidmore / flickr

Rick Perry wants to use money left over from his failed presidential bid to form a political action committee supporting other candidates.

Perry's campaign has written to the Federal Election Commission asking about forming a PAC or super PAC.

A PAC would allow Perry to raise up to $5,000 from individual donors. Super PACs don't impose contribution limits.

The letter says Perry raised $270,000 for the general presidential election and now is asking donors if that money can be transferred to a PAC since he didn't win the Republican nomination.