Think | KERA News

Think

Think, with host Krys Boyd, features in-depth interviews with compelling guests, covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and trends to food and wine, travel, adventure and entertainment.

Think airs live Monday through Thursday from noon to 1 pm on KERA 90.1 FM in North Texas, and Monday through Friday from 1 to 2 pm on KERA and other public radio stations across Texas.

Ways to Connect

Art Evans / Katharina Grosse

PBS debuts its seventh season of Art:21 on KERA next month.  The show features twentieth century contemporary artists from the United States, Europe, and Latin America and takes viewers to their studios and installations. At 1 p.m. on Think, host Krys Boyd will talk to Susan Sollins, Art21’s executive producer and curator, before she's at Texas Theatre tonight. First, get acquainted with this season's artists.

Susan Melkisethian / flickr

The government and the press butt heads over access to intelligence often. Krys Boyd will speak to Stephen Whitfield, American studies professor at Brandeis University, about finding the equilibrium between national security and freedom of the press at 1 p.m. today.

kymberlyanne / Flickr

There are many factors that come into play while growing up. Teenagers have a lot to think about when it comes to the future, and as recent studies have proven, the crucial influence in determining life outcomes takes place during the adolescent years. Psychology professor Laurence Steinberg joins Krys Boyd at 1 p.m. on Think to discuss these findings and how parents can update their understanding of younger generations.

Riccardo Romano / Flickr

The once-empty factories, U-Bahn stations and warehouses of Berlin became havens for nightlife and experimentation after the Wall came down in 1990. Think host Krys Boyd talks with German novelist and critic Peter Schneider at noon about how people in the city challenged standards of aesthetic and historical memory by repurposing industrial space - and buildings marked by the horrors of World War II. 

scubasteveo / Flickr

We tend to associate "studying" with “hitting the books” -- lots of discipline and focus. At 1 p.m. on Think, education reporter Benedict Carey of the New York Times explains how new brain science affirms the wandering mind over a one-track approach. His new book is called How We Learn.

Library of Congress

Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis are some of the more prominent names in American Civil War history. Yet, it wasn’t an all-boys club on the war front. There were other heroes – in this case, heroines – who were moving chess pieces on both sides of the war.

Study Up For 'Think': The Making Of The Meyerson

Sep 4, 2014
Jerome Weeks KERA News

This month marks the 25th anniversary of the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center's grand opening in the Dallas Arts District. To celebrate, author Laurie Shulman and Art&Seek reporter Jerome Weeks join Think at 1 p.m. to talk about the inception of the project and the construction of the building.

US Air Force / flickr

The NFL reported 228 cases of diagnosed concussions in the 2013 season. Research has revealed prolonged head injuries suffered playing football have lead to dementia, cognitive decline, ALS and Parkinson's among its players. Steve Almond, writer and author of Against Football: One Fan's Reluctant Manifesto, will join Krys Boyd at 1 p.m. on Think to discuss the issue from an aware fan's perspective.

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In 1987, Michael Morton was sentenced to life in prison for murdering his wife – a crime he didn’t commit. He served 25 years before having his conviction overturned. Monday on Think, he told Krys Boyd that for many of those years, his life was ruled by resentment and thoughts of revenge.

Study Up For 'Think': What We See When We Read

Aug 21, 2014
Nathaniel Bellows / Twitter

How do the words we read on a page translate into the images we see in our head? Peter Mendelsund, Associate Art Director for Alfred A. Knopf Books, joins Krys Boyd on Think today. At 1 p.m., he’ll discuss the neuroscience behind reading, which he covers in his book What We See When We Read.

intelfreepress / Flickr

Two summers ago, the Mars Curiosity rover made its landing on the red planet. Approximately thirty-five million miles from Earth, the $2.5 billion robot has had faced its ups and downs. At noon, Marc Kaufman, author of Mars Up Close: Inside the Curiosity Mission, talks with Krys Boyd on Think about the rover’s journey so far.

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Followers of the Paleo Diet believe we should stick to foods that our hunter-gatherer ancestors ate. Protein – good. Carbs – bad. Today on Think, Krys Boyd talked to a National Geographic writer who’s studied the evolution of the human diet to get her take.

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If you’re constantly misplacing your keys and forgetting items on your grocery list, you probably just chalk it up to a bad memory. There are, however, steps you can take to improve your ability to retain information. On Tuesday on KERA's Think, Krys Boyd talked to a neuroscientist to get a few tips.

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In anticipation of our conversation about teen pregnancy on Think, let's meet some young women who let us in on their visions of the future. If they can't see themselves down the road ahead, teenagers are more likely to have kids before they're ready.

Jeff Heimsath / Texas Tribune

The U.S. locks up more kids than any other industrialized nation in the world. Today at 1 p.m. on Think, we'll be speaking to author and journalist Nell Bernstein about the phenomenon and alternatives to locking kids up in her book Burning Down The House: The End Of Juvenile Prison.

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Traffic, work, kids - these are all sources of stress. And as you probably also know, stress is a drain on the body. Today on Think, Krys Boyd talked to a Harvard researcher about how our bodies respond to stress.

Robert Tewart / Flickr CC

While Texas continues to experience a three-year drought, maintaining a green lawn or a flourishing garden can be a daunting task. Today at noon on 'Think', we'll be speaking with Noelle Johnson, a horticulturalist with Birds and Blooms magazine about drought-resistant gardening.

Study Up For 'Think': Dynamics Of A Duo

Aug 5, 2014
12th St David / flickr

If it wasn't for Wilbur Wright's younger brother Orville, would aviation still exist? Could Francis Crick have discovered the structure of a DNA molecule without James Watson? Today at noon on Think, Joshua Wolf Shenk, essayist and author of Powers of Two: Finding the Essence of Innovation in Creative Pairs, will join Krys Boyd to discuss why two minds are more successful than one.

Copyright © 2014, Jeffrey Gusky All Rights Reserved.

The August issue of National Geographic features photographs of art made by soldiers in the trenches of World War I. The images were captured by Jeff Gusky, who’s also an emergency room physician in North Texas. Today on Think, he told Krys Boyd that his experiences as a photographer and doctor are intimately connected.

Study Up For 'Think': The Hidden World Of WWI

Jul 31, 2014
Jeff Gusky

This summer marks the centennial anniversary of the First World War. But recently, unknown underground cities of the trenches were discovered. Today at 1 p.m. on Think, Dallas photographer Jeff Gusky joins Krys Boyd to talk about his collection of photographs that document the unseen artwork, artifacts, and sculptures of WWI.

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Years after covering conflict in Afghanistan, Anna Badkhen returned to the country in 2011, traveling through a roadless desert to a poor village called Oqa. Tonight, Badkhen speaks at The Wild Detectives bookstore in Oak Cliff. 

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One of the most difficult things for many of us to do is to forgive. Today on Think, a psychologist who studies people’s ability to heal after a trauma told Krys Boyd that forgiveness is a key to moving on.

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People with Parkinson’s Disease struggle with movements that used to be automatic. That includes walking, blinking and speaking. Today on Think, a speech-language pathologist talked to Krys Boyd about a North Texas program that’s helping Parkinson’s patients regain the ability to speak.

Samatha Elandary says problems for Parkinson’s patients start with a shortage of dopamine in the brain.

Study Up For 'Think': Marijuana By Numbers

Jul 24, 2014
Brett Levin / Flickr CC

With the legal weed market starting up in Colorado and Washington this year, marijuana is being widely discussed among scientists and researchers across the country. Today at noon on Think, we'll be speaking with Dr. Francesca Filbey and Dr. Robert Morris, two researchers at UT Dallas who've recently completed studies about pot, addiction and crime.

Study Up For 'Think': Can Culture Make Us Crazy?

Jul 22, 2014
juliendn / Flickr

Our surroundings affect the way we think and act. But psychiatrist Joel and philosopher Ian Gold take this idea further to mental health. The two brothers examined specific cases where society and culture have played a role in producing delusions. Joel joins Krys Boyd today on Think at noon to talk about their latest book, Suspicious Minds: How Culture Shapes Madness.

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How we interact with the world is part of what makes us unique. But what if you saw and heard the exact same things as someone else?

Study Up for 'Think': Go Far, Alone

Jul 17, 2014
Mario Mancuso / flickr

Leading a fulfilling life means something different for everyone. While some will want to settle down and have families, others feel more at home as nomads. At 1 p.m. on Think, Kristin Newman, sitcom writer and author of What I Was Doing While You Were Breeding, joins Krys Boyd to talk about the road less traveled.

Muhammad Ghafari / Wikimedia CC

During the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011, many Americans thought the abrupt change of the political climate in the region would bring lasting improvements. But was this optimism justified? Today at noon on 'Think', we'll be speaking with Juan Cole, author of The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East.

afagen / Flickr

The United States Census Bureau reported that Asians were the fastest growing race or ethnic group in 2012, with a growth rate of 2.9%. But as the Asian American population continues to grow, what does it mean to identify as a part of that group? Today on Think at 1 p.m., Citizen University founder and former Clinton advisor Eric Liu joins Krys Boyd to talk about his new book A Chinaman’s Chance: One Family’s Journey and the Chinese American Dream.

Lammyman / Flickr CC

Dallas has a rich history of musical innovation that goes back to the roots of modern music. But little is known about the city’s musical heritage throughout much of the 20th century. Today at 1 p.m. on Think, guest host Jeff Whittington will be speaking with Alan Govenar, co-author of Dallas Music Scene: 1920’s to 1960’s.

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