Think | KERA News

Think

Think, with host Krys Boyd, features in-depth interviews with compelling guests, covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and trends to food and wine, travel, adventure and entertainment.

Think airs live Monday through Thursday from noon to 1 pm on KERA 90.1 FM in North Texas, and Monday through Friday from 1 to 2 pm on KERA and other public radio stations across Texas.

Ways to Connect

youtube

Every once in a while at Think, we reschedule a guest last-minute when news breaks. Last week I called Change Of Heart author Jeanne Bishop to explain we'd have to find another time slot. Could she do Tuesday, April 7, instead? "Actually, that's 25 years to the day since my sister was murdered," Bishop told me.  

Shutterstock

Last week, Dallas County District Attorney Susan Hawk acknowledged that she sought treatment for prescription drugs during her campaign. On Tuesday's Think, KERA's Krys Boyd talked with a panel of addiction experts about the unique challenges in treating this type of dependence.

PBS

If you haven't battled cancer or suffered through it with a loved one, odds are you will. One in three women and nearly one in two men face it directly. Cancer's torturous history of promised cures, setbacks and hope renewed is laid out in an upcoming six-hour Ken Burns film series called Cancer: The Emperor Of All Maladies. 

Study Up For 'Think': The Hairy Truth Of Hair Removal

Feb 11, 2015
Daniel Horacio Agostini, flickr

Waxing, shaving, tweezing, threading, epilating, lasering ... while the methods vary, the vast majority of Americans have tried removing body hair they find unsightly. At noon, Krys Boyd will sit down with historian Rebecca Herzig, author of Plucked: A History of Hair Removal.

AT&T Performing Arts Center

There’s another reason to look forward to summer besides the warmer temperatures. KERA and the AT&T Performing Arts Center in Dallas are teaming up to produce a new summer speaker series called #thinkspeak.

Solving poverty and widening access to education start with equipping women to excel in their lives, especially young mothers. We'll get a glimpse at programs around the world and the individuals fighting to help women in the documentary series A Path Appears

Study Up for ‘Think’: Uncovering A Dark Past

Jan 29, 2015
Shutterstock

Crystal City was once home to the only internment camp in Texas. Known as the "quiet passage," immigrants from Germany, Italy and Japan would settle in the small town during WWII.  

Study Up For Think: The Creativity Crisis

Jan 28, 2015
Shutterstock

The music recording business has plummeted in value. Hundreds of newspapers across the country have shuttered. Arts programs in schools are getting slashed.

Study Up For Think: Accuracy, The Enemy Of Groupthink

Jan 21, 2015
rawdonfox / Flickr

Groupthink occurs when a set of people prioritize harmony and group cohesiveness over accuracy and diversity. At 1 p.m., Krys Boyd will chat with Cass Sunstein, co-author of Wiser: Getting Beyond Groupthink to Make Groups Smarter.

Shutterstock

Brain plasticity is the idea that brains aren’t static entities but rather are constantly being reorganized when learning or experiencing novel things. Thus, it’s no surprise that aspects of poverty—crowding, violence, hunger, family instability—have been shown to change the brain for the worse and impact language, learning and attention span among kids.

Study Up For 'Think': A Natural Fix For ADHD

Nov 20, 2014
Shutterstock

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder affects eleven percent of kids ages 4-17. In the first hour of 'Think', we'll talk about the root causes of A.D.H.D. and a natural approach to treating the condition with Dr. Richard Friedman, who recently wrote an article in The New York Times about the disorder.

Study Up For 'Think': Using The Food We Waste

Oct 14, 2014
Shutterstock

Food waste is a huge problem in industrialized nations where many households and businesses have more food than they really need. Today, in the second hour of 'Think' we'll be speaking to Elizabeth Royte, who writes about better uses for food waste in the November issue of National Geographic.

Study Up for ‘Think’: A Guide to Good Writing

Oct 2, 2014
Rebecca Goldstein

Steven Pinker tells new ways to wield the pen - or keyboard - in his new book, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century.  Pinker joins Think today at noon to speak with Krys Boyd about crafting clear, compelling, and elegant prose.

Alfred Palmer / The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

In Anne Wilkes Tucker’s exhibition, WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and its Aftermath, viewers get a look through the lens at the many sides, stories, and effects of war. The collection is one of Tucker’s final projects before retirement in June 2015. She joins Think today at noon to explore the history of war photography and look back on her forty years at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Art Evans / Katharina Grosse

PBS debuts its seventh season of Art:21 on KERA next month.  The show features twentieth century contemporary artists from the United States, Europe, and Latin America and takes viewers to their studios and installations. At 1 p.m. on Think, host Krys Boyd will talk to Susan Sollins, Art21’s executive producer and curator, before she's at Texas Theatre tonight. First, get acquainted with this season's artists.

Susan Melkisethian / flickr

The government and the press butt heads over access to intelligence often. Krys Boyd will speak to Stephen Whitfield, American studies professor at Brandeis University, about finding the equilibrium between national security and freedom of the press at 1 p.m. today.

kymberlyanne / Flickr

There are many factors that come into play while growing up. Teenagers have a lot to think about when it comes to the future, and as recent studies have proven, the crucial influence in determining life outcomes takes place during the adolescent years. Psychology professor Laurence Steinberg joins Krys Boyd at 1 p.m. on Think to discuss these findings and how parents can update their understanding of younger generations.

Riccardo Romano / Flickr

The once-empty factories, U-Bahn stations and warehouses of Berlin became havens for nightlife and experimentation after the Wall came down in 1990. Think host Krys Boyd talks with German novelist and critic Peter Schneider at noon about how people in the city challenged standards of aesthetic and historical memory by repurposing industrial space - and buildings marked by the horrors of World War II. 

scubasteveo / Flickr

We tend to associate "studying" with “hitting the books” -- lots of discipline and focus. At 1 p.m. on Think, education reporter Benedict Carey of the New York Times explains how new brain science affirms the wandering mind over a one-track approach. His new book is called How We Learn.

Library of Congress

Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis are some of the more prominent names in American Civil War history. Yet, it wasn’t an all-boys club on the war front. There were other heroes – in this case, heroines – who were moving chess pieces on both sides of the war.

Study Up For 'Think': The Making Of The Meyerson

Sep 4, 2014
Jerome Weeks KERA News

This month marks the 25th anniversary of the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center's grand opening in the Dallas Arts District. To celebrate, author Laurie Shulman and Art&Seek reporter Jerome Weeks join Think at 1 p.m. to talk about the inception of the project and the construction of the building.

US Air Force / flickr

The NFL reported 228 cases of diagnosed concussions in the 2013 season. Research has revealed prolonged head injuries suffered playing football have lead to dementia, cognitive decline, ALS and Parkinson's among its players. Steve Almond, writer and author of Against Football: One Fan's Reluctant Manifesto, will join Krys Boyd at 1 p.m. on Think to discuss the issue from an aware fan's perspective.

Shutterstock

In 1987, Michael Morton was sentenced to life in prison for murdering his wife – a crime he didn’t commit. He served 25 years before having his conviction overturned. Monday on Think, he told Krys Boyd that for many of those years, his life was ruled by resentment and thoughts of revenge.

Study Up For 'Think': What We See When We Read

Aug 21, 2014
Nathaniel Bellows / Twitter

How do the words we read on a page translate into the images we see in our head? Peter Mendelsund, Associate Art Director for Alfred A. Knopf Books, joins Krys Boyd on Think today. At 1 p.m., he’ll discuss the neuroscience behind reading, which he covers in his book What We See When We Read.

intelfreepress / Flickr

Two summers ago, the Mars Curiosity rover made its landing on the red planet. Approximately thirty-five million miles from Earth, the $2.5 billion robot has had faced its ups and downs. At noon, Marc Kaufman, author of Mars Up Close: Inside the Curiosity Mission, talks with Krys Boyd on Think about the rover’s journey so far.

Shutterstock

Followers of the Paleo Diet believe we should stick to foods that our hunter-gatherer ancestors ate. Protein – good. Carbs – bad. Today on Think, Krys Boyd talked to a National Geographic writer who’s studied the evolution of the human diet to get her take.

Shutterstock

If you’re constantly misplacing your keys and forgetting items on your grocery list, you probably just chalk it up to a bad memory. There are, however, steps you can take to improve your ability to retain information. On Tuesday on KERA's Think, Krys Boyd talked to a neuroscientist to get a few tips.

Shutterstock

In anticipation of our conversation about teen pregnancy on Think, let's meet some young women who let us in on their visions of the future. If they can't see themselves down the road ahead, teenagers are more likely to have kids before they're ready.

Jeff Heimsath / Texas Tribune

The U.S. locks up more kids than any other industrialized nation in the world. Today at 1 p.m. on Think, we'll be speaking to author and journalist Nell Bernstein about the phenomenon and alternatives to locking kids up in her book Burning Down The House: The End Of Juvenile Prison.

Shutterstock

Traffic, work, kids - these are all sources of stress. And as you probably also know, stress is a drain on the body. Today on Think, Krys Boyd talked to a Harvard researcher about how our bodies respond to stress.

Pages