Think | KERA News

Think

Think, with host Krys Boyd, features in-depth interviews with compelling guests, covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and trends to food and wine, travel, adventure and entertainment.

Think airs live Monday through Thursday from noon to 1 pm on KERA 90.1 FM in North Texas, and Monday through Friday from 1 to 2 pm on KERA and other public radio stations across Texas.

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How To Win The Millennial Vote

Aug 24, 2016
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Millennials are the largest generation in the U.S. and the biggest portion of the electorate. It’s hard to predict, though, how they will vote in November.

Why We All Need Awe

Aug 23, 2016
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If you’ve ever been on a hike or stared up at the night sky in amazement then you know what it feels like to be awestruck. On Think, Krys Boyd talked with journalist Carlin Flora about why we need to seek out that kind of wonder in our everyday lives.  

How Screen Addiction Is Hurting Children

Aug 17, 2016
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The average child spends more than six hours a day on a smart phone, tablet or computer. So what is all that screen time doing to their brains?

Want To Reduce Gun Violence? Look At The Numbers

Aug 16, 2016
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National headlines on gun violence tend to focus on mass shootings and terrorism. Nearly two-thirds of gun deaths in the U.S., though, are suicides. Today on Think, Krys Boyd explored these numbers with Ben Casselman who’s reported on gun deaths for the website FiveThirtyEight.com.

Olympian Frank Shorter On Living A Gold Medal Life

Aug 10, 2016
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The Rio Olympics will culminate with one of its signature events, the marathon. Frank Shorter is the last American man to have won a gold medal in the sport at the 1972 Olympics in Munich.

Is White Rage Behind America's Racial Divide?

Aug 9, 2016
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Today marks two years since Michael Brown was fatally shot by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. When the Justice Department investigated the city’s police department, it found evidence of racial bias.

The Case For Universal Basic Income

Aug 8, 2016
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Today Donald Trump laid out his economic plan, and later this week Hillary Clinton will do the same. They’ve got different ideas about how to help American workers, yet there’s one idea neither of them has mentioned to date – a universal basic income. Today on Think, Krys Boyd talked about the idea with Andy Stern, a senior fellow at Columbia University. He’s the author of "Raising the Floor: How a Universal Basic Income Can Renew Our Economy and Rebuild the American Dream."

A Conservative Solution To Climate Change

Aug 4, 2016
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Traditionally political progressives have taken the lead to minimize climate change. And they may soon gain some unlikely allies. Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke to former U.S. Rep. Bob Inglis – a republican from South Carolina – about developing a market-based approach to fighting global warming.

How Body Cameras Will Change Policing

Aug 2, 2016
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Last year the Dallas Police Department signed a $3.7 million contract with a technology company called Axon to purchase cloud storage for video shot on police body cameras. Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke with journalist Karen Weise about how Axon and body cameras will affect how police officers do their jobs. Her cover story, “Can CopCams Make Better Cops?” appears in a recent issue of Bloomberg Business Week magazine. 

Southern Poverty Law Center

Note: The Southern Poverty Law Center updated its numbers in February 2017 to account for the changes in U.S. hate groups in 2016. The data in this post reflect 2015.

 

There are 892 active hate groups in the U.S. In Texas, there are 84 — the most of any other state, according to an interactive U.S. map from Southern Poverty Law Center.

The Path For Clinton

Jul 28, 2016
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Hillary Clinton will accept the nomination for president tonight at the Democratic National Convention. Today on Think, Krys Boyd hosted a two-hour special on Hillary Clinton and the DNC. The episode featured a report from NPR’s Sam Sanders, a look at Clinton's background and a panel of political scientists discussing the convention so far. 

Javier Giribet-Vargas / KERA News

On July 5, Alton Sterling was killed by police officers in Baton Rouge. Two days later in downtown Dallas, at the end of a peaceful protest against the police killings of Sterling and other black men, a lone shooter gunned down five police officers.

Thoughts On Trails - And How They're Made

Jul 25, 2016
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If you live in North Texas, you’ve probably taken a stroll down the Katy Trail or spent the morning hiking at Cedar Ridge Preserve. Ever wonder, though, how these things got there? Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke with Robert Moor, author of “On Trails: An Exploration,” about the role people play in forming new paths

How Donald Trump's Convention Is Breaking Convention

Jul 21, 2016
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Donald Trump will accept the nomination for president tonight at the Republican National Convention. Today on Think, Krys Boyd hosted a two-hour special on the party's nominee and the convention. The episode featured a conversation with NPR’s Sam Sanders from Cleveland and looks at Trump’s background and how he’s rewritten the rules of campaigning.

An Empty-Nester On Moving Forward

Jul 19, 2016
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When kids move out of the house—to college or to a first apartment—the homes they leave behind are never quite the same. So what is a parent to do? Melissa Shultz is the author of, “From Mom to Me Again: How I Survived My First Empty-Nest Year and Reinvented the Rest of My Life.” Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke with her about how parents can refocus their lives once children are gone.

Four Ways Americans Can Unite In Spite Of Recent Violence

Jul 18, 2016
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Violence across the country this summer — in Orlando, Dallas and Baton Rouge – along with videos of shootings of civilians by police has many Americans on edge. Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke with Washington University associate law professor John Inazu about ways to bridge the current divides within American society. John Inazu is the author of, “Confident Pluralism: Surviving and Thriving Through Deep Difference.”

An Alzheimer's Researcher On How To Curb The Disease

Jun 28, 2016
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Anyone who makes it into old age will have a brain that shows some signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Some people suffer symptoms, though, while others don’t. Today on Think, Lauren Silverman spoke with David Bennett, director of the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, about new research into how we can keep our minds sharp and avoid dementia.

Millennials Are Not Keeping The Faith

Jun 27, 2016
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Young people in America have more freedom to find a religion that suits them than ever before. At the same time, more than one-third of people in their 20s and 30s identify as not being religious. Yesterday on Think, told Lauren Silverman talked with Emma Green, who writes about religion for The Atlantic, about how millennials navigate their spiritual lives.  

In Cardiology, It's Still A Man's World

Jun 24, 2016
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Half of all medical students in the U.S. are women. But there’s one specialty they rarely go into: cardiology. Yesterday on Think, told Lauren Silverman talked with a panel of women heart doctors about why there are so few female cardiologist, how that affects patient care and what can be done to even out the numbers.

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Crime scene DNA has traditionally been used to link a victim to a criminal. With a new process known as phenotyping, though, investigators are using that DNA to reverse engineer a profile of what the perpetrator might look like. Today on "Think," Lauren Silverman talked with National Geographic online science editor Erika Engelhaupt about phenotyping and other CSI innovations. The story, “Beyond a Reasonable Doubt” appears in the July issue of National Geographic magazine.

Self-Driving Cars? Probably Not In Your Lifetime

Jun 16, 2016
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General Motors, Google, Tesla and others are all in the race to produce self-driving cars. And just last month, Nissan announced its driverless car will roll out in 2020. Today on "Think," guest host Lauren Silverman talked with U.C. Berkley research engineer Steven Shladover about how these cars will function, how engineers are making them safe and when we will see them on the road.

Need A Reason To Vote? Here Are A Few

Jun 15, 2016
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This story is part of A Nation Engaged, a collaborative project between NPR and its member stations. This week's question: "Does my vote matter? More than 4.2 million Texans cast a ballot in March’s primaries. That’s only about 20 percent of eligible voters in the state. Today on "Think," Lauren Silverman spoke with North Texas political organizers about convincing people that their votes count.

Orlando Crisis Shines A Light On Blood Donations

Jun 14, 2016
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In the hours following this weekend’s mass shooting in Orlando, people across the country headed to their local blood banks to make a donation. Today on Think, guest host Lauren Silverman explored how our blood supply is managed, whether we are equipped to mobilize mass blood drives and why some people can’t donate with Dr. Ravi Sarode, director of transfusion medicine and hemostasis at UT Southwestern Medical Center, and Dr. William Crews, medical director of laboratory services for Carter BloodCare.

How America Fell In Love With Guns

Jun 13, 2016
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As the county reels from Sunday morning’s events in Orlando, America’s complicated relationship with guns is once again a public conversation. Earlier this month on Think, Krys Boyd explored the topic with Pamela Haag, author of, “The Gunning of America: Business and the Making of American Gun Culture.”

Jeff Whittington / KERA News

As part of KERA's week in Washington, D.C., the "Think" team got a special tour of the newsroom (and the elevators) from one of the most recognizable voices on public radio, Susan Stamberg.

KERA

'Think' will be broadcasting live from NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., this week.

Facebook

Five stories that have North Texas talking: The dissatisfied lawyer seeks $2.25 for the soup plus $250 in legal fees; a Laredo-born musician remembers his time with Prince; KERA’s Think is in D.C. and more.

How Autism Diagnostics Overlook Girls

Mar 24, 2016

One in 68 kids in the U.S. is affected by autism, with boys receiving four times as many diagnoses as girls. New research suggests that that disparity may be the result of girls on the spectrum getting overlooked and misdiagnosed.  

Rethinking How Prison Works

Mar 22, 2016
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The United States is the world’s biggest jailer, with 2.3 million people locked up here.

WFAA

Television news anchors wear a lot of hats: they inform us, they entertain us, and sometimes they even comfort us. John McCaa has served all of those roles as an anchor at WFAA-TV. Today on "Think" and during a public forum tonight, he talked to Krys Boyd about being a calming and level-headed presence when the news might cause some to panic.

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