telemedicine | KERA News

telemedicine

Children's Health System

There are a number of differences between the shelters housing Harvey evacuees and the ones where victims of Katrina went 12 years ago. A big one is telemedicine. Children, especially, are being treated by doctors in remote locations.

 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Telemedicine, which connects doctors and patients virtually, has made a big difference in North Texas schools for students with physical issues.

This fall, the same technology will be available to connect students and their behavioral therapists in a pilot program from Children's Health.

Delcia Lopez / The Texas Tribune

Teladoc, the Dallas-based company that sued Texas over its telemedicine regulations, has a new ally in the Federal Trade Commission.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

When children get sick at school, it can be a big disruption. For the kids – they have to miss class –and for mom or dad, who have to leave work, try and schedule a last minute doctor’s appointment, maybe even go to the emergency room. So, what if kids could see a pediatrician without having to leave school? That’s the idea behind a telemedicine initiative run by Children’s Health. The program has gone from reaching several hundred kids to in Texas to thousands.

Long hospital stays and frequent checkups are a drag. And they’re especially hard on kids who often fall behind in school and miss spending time with friends. To help these patients stay home, Children’s Medical Center in Dallas is trying to connect with kids using video and Bluetooth after organ transplants.

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Consulting a doctor by phone, text or video is becoming popular. And in Texas, the debate over safety and access to health care is heating up. 

Figure 1

While you’re on Instagram looking at lolcats, artisan desserts and celebrity selfies, some doctors are on a different photo sharing app, called Figure 1, looking at gangrene, gallstones and rashes.

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On average, every four minutes someone dies of a stroke.

Strokes are also the leading cause of long-term disability in the U.S. But technological and medical advances can help diagnose a stroke early. And early diagnosis and treatment for strokes can mean the difference between life and death.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

A shortage of medical specialists, combined with a glut of newly insured patients has put some rural Texas hospitals in a bind.

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When someone’s brought into the emergency room for acute ischemic stroke – or a blocked artery to the brain – a neurologist is called in to determine treatment. But back in 2010, Baylor Healthcare System noticed a problem at a regional center in Waxahachie: speed. The solution was a telemedicine program using laptop cameras and a robotic device to save crucial time in providing treatment. Dr. Dion Graybeal, medical director of the Baylor stroke program, talks about how it’s done  in this installment of KERA’s Vital Signs.

Signs of a stroke require attention as soon as possible. Doctors are using videoconferencing with laptop cameras and a robotic device to save crucial time. Dr. Dion Graybeal, medical director of Baylor's stroke program, talks with KERA's Sam Baker about the latest developments.