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technology

Worried about Internet companies snooping on your online browsing? You might turn to something called a virtual private network to protect your privacy. But researchers say these networks can themselves be insecure.

Earlier this year, the federal government rolled back rules that would have prevented Internet service providers from tracking your activity online.

Every year, hundreds of millions of documents are notarized in the United States: wills, mortgages, citizenship forms, handgun applications. And since the founding of this nation, notarizations have been done pretty much the same way: in person.

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Photographing yourself with a smartphone seems harmless. But a man in Washington state died February 28 after accidentally shooting himself in the face while posing with a gun. And at least 49 others here and abroad have died from selfie-related accidents.

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Doctors at Cook Children’s Medical Center in Fort Worth are used to treating cases of abuse. But what they’d really like to do is prevent it. So they’re experimenting with “big data” technology that could help predict neighborhoods where kids are most likely to be abused.

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It can be tricky to pin down a patent troll.

 

Gil Gillam, artist and attorney with Gillam & Smith LLP in Marshall, Texas.

East Texas is known for its Piney Woods, Caddo Lake, maybe for sweet potatoes. It’s also the patent lawsuit capitol of the country. More patent infringement cases are brought to Eastern District courts than anywhere else. There’s pressure to root out the so-called “patent trolls”.

Transforming Dallas Into Something Called A 'Smart City'

Nov 18, 2015
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Efforts are underway to transform Dallas into a Smart City. That designation involves building an advanced network that can monitor everything from a city's energy consumption to when a garbage can needs to be changed. 

Health Wildcatters

Ten young companies from across the world snagged a spot in the 2015 class of Health Wildcatters. Some entrepreneurs have developed products – one for reducing the risk of stroke, another for easy eye exams – others, health services – like fast access to specialists through telemedicine and bilingual wellness programs for employers. Each company gets $35,000 in seed money and space to work for three months.

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The Americans with Disabilities Act opened up services and opportunities for people with disabilities. Twenty-five years later, North Texas developers are testing new technologies with the disabled community in mind.

Vinli

Can any car be turned into a smart car? A Dallas-based startup called Vinli has captured the attention of drivers across the country with a device promising to do just that. We tested it out.

Lauren Silverman/KERA News

Profits for Dallas-based Texas Instruments are looking good – and it’s not from selling calculators. TI’s automotive business is growing faster than the rest of the company, thanks to selling microprocessors and car technology. 

KERA News

High school and college students from across North America will be in Dallas this weekend for what’s being called a hackathon. 

UT-Dallas

Wichita Falls native Austin Howard recently became the University of Texas at Dallas’ youngest doctoral graduate ever. All of 22 years old, he earned his Ph.D. in physics last Saturday. 

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

If you’re trying to combine education with entertainment this holiday season you’re not alone. The aisles of kids toys are packed with high-tech gadgets promise to challenge the mind. So which ones are good?

University of North Texas

Spoons, forks, candelabra…The Dallas Museum of Art has the world’s largest collection of American silver objects from the 19th and 20th century. But curators and conservators don’t have much history on what they’re made of or how they were created. To investigate the artifacts, a scientist at the University of North Texas Dallas is using nano-scale tests.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

A little travel tech could help you get to your turkey on time.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

New technology out of Texas is making it harder for criminals to cover their tracks. A University of North Texas chemistry professor has created a device for the U.S. Department of Justice to analyze the tiny particles of inks, paints, and other materials criminals use to create counterfeit documents. It’s called a nanomanipulator.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Nearly a quarter of Texas business owners are foreign born. These entrepreneurs brought in a total income of $10 billion dollars in 2010. Still, immigration is a sticking point, and some Texas entrepreneurs are pushing for more high-skilled visas.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

It’s back-to-school time for twelve innovative startups in Dallas. Today, Health Wildcatters, the Southwest’s first healthcare seed-accelerator, announced which companies were chosen for the second class of the Dallas-based accelerator. Five have Dallas ties.

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If you take a virtual stroll through the iTunes store or Google Play you will find nearly a hundred thousand health apps. Everything from fitness trackers to blood glucose monitors. Out of all these apps, only about 100 have been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration. Some lawyers are calling for more regulation.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

About half of the U.S workforce is female, but only 1 in 4 jobs in STEM fields go to women. We checked out a summer camp at the University of Texas at Dallas that aims to get girls excited about science, technology, engineering and math.

Andy Taylor / KERA News

Technology companies have a "legal and moral obligation" to be transparent about the racial makeup of their workforces, the Rev. Jesse Jackson told KERA Thursday afternoon.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

Getting kids interested in science, technology, engineering and math can be a challenge for teachers. It can be even more challenging if the students are girls. That’s just one of the many topics that came up during a discussion about tomorrow’s workforce at Texas Tribune’s Symposium on STEM Education on Monday.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

This month, a new — and some say more challenging — GED test rolled out. After 70-plus years, paper is out, and online is in.

Forty states, including Texas, are offering this revamped version. Students and instructors in one Fort Worth test-prep class are having to adapt.

My BuddyTag

Keeping track of your kids at a theme park or fair can be a challenge. That’s why Plano parent and engineer Willy Wu created a device called BuddyTag. There’s no GPS involved -- just a phone and a wristband.

If you’re looking to kick your health tech startup into high gear, Dallas-Fort Worth is a sweet spot to set up shop. Among DFW’s offerings: a roaring tech sector, startup meetups galore and top medical schools, to  name a few.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

For the past decade, UTD professor Orlando Auciello has been obsessed with growing diamonds. But instead of trying to create the biggest gem possible, he’s been trying to craft the thinnest possible layer of diamond. This thin coating could advance everything from hip implants to hydraulic pumps.

Caritas / CAFOD

One of the biggest challenges after a disaster the size of Super Typhoon Haiyan is coordinating the delivery of relief materials. The water, medicine and food can only help if it arrives where it’s needed, when it’s needed. That’s where technology comes into play, and a north Texas organization called Aidmatrix.

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So what's behind the traffic jam at healthcare.gov? With the help of Dallas tech guru Mark Haider, and his simple highway analogy, you'll be an expert in no time.

Launch DFW

Good news for tech startups in North Texas: Dallas is about to get its own permanent “Shark Tank,” albeit on a smaller, less flashy stage.

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