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standardized testing

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Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath was in Dallas this week to talk about how the state’s schools are doing -- and the impact Hurricane Harvey has had on education.

State education leaders want 60 percent of Texans 25 to 34 years old to have some kind of post-secondary certificate or degree by the year 2030. But to get there, students need to be ready to take college-level classes, and it can take leaders time to agree just who qualifies as prepared.


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Last week, The College Board released the latest batch of SAT scores for high school students – and they’re down nationwide. They’re even worse in Texas. 

Texas House Moves To End High-Stakes Writing Tests

Apr 30, 2015
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The Texas House Wednesday moved a step closer to getting rid of writing exams that are tripping up many high school students.

KERA, the Dallas Morning News, NBC5 and Telemundo 39 recently asked Texans to identify the issues they're most concerned about. For five days this week we're combining forces to look at where Republican Greg Abbott and Democrat Wendy Davis stand on those issues. We began looking at the candidates' views on education, followed by the border, healthcare, the economy and infrastructure.

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Today KERA, The Dallas Morning News and KXAS-TV (NBC 5) begin a series of coordinated reports we’re calling Five Days in October. Each day we’ll look at where the leading candidates for governor stand on certain issues. We begin with education, and answers to a question about student test scores that was tweeted during KERA’s televised gubernatorial debate last week.

In Austin, College Board Announces Major SAT Changes

Mar 5, 2014
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The SAT, a standardized test that for many students is an intimidating hurdle to clear en route to college admissions, is about to undergo a major redesign. Among the changes being announced by The College Board in Austin on Wednesday: The test will revert to a 1600-point scale, and the essay portion will be optional and scored separately.

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A new report raises questions about whether tests like the SAT and ACT are a good indicator of how well students will do in college. The study, which was published by the National Association for College Admission Counseling, looked at student data from 33 colleges and universities around the country that have optional admissions policies.

You can see an interview with the study’s author below and read more about it here.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

David Marquis has spent nearly 40 years writing and performing three installments of his one-man play ‘I Am A Teacher.’ He draws from that experience in the classroom, diving into education issues that are as relevant today as when he wrote part one in 1976. The three plays will be performed as a trilogy for the first time this weekend at The McKinney Avenue Contemporary in Dallas.

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Gov. Rick Perry has signed into law a much debated high school curriculum overhaul that cuts the number of standardized tests Texas students must take. 

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Many Texas lawmakers said their top priority for the legislative session that just ended was to improve public education.  So what did they accomplish?

As part of KERA’s American Graduate initiative, three North Texas legislators came to our studios to talk education: Rep. Helen Giddings, a Dallas Democrat; Rep. Diane Patrick, an Arlington Republican, and Rep. Jason Villalba, a Dallas Republican.

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State Rep. Diane Patrick, an Arlington Republican, has filed school legislation that would reduce the number of end-of-course exams from 15 to 3.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Texas Education Commissioner Michael Williams says he’s heard the complaints and agrees: Schools and student learning need to be evaluated differently.

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Third through ninth grade public school students take the new STAAR test today, for the first time. KERA’s Bill Zeeble has more on the “end of course” State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness tests.

An attorney defending Republican-drawn voting maps in Texas has told a federal court there are "insurmountable" differences preventing a compromise with minority rights groups.

Testimony has finished in a trial determining whether new political district lines drawn by the Texas Legislature violated the federal Voting Rights Act. Attention will now quickly shift to San Antonio where another federal court is charged with drawing interim maps.