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science

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

The first day of school is always a big deal. Kids have to get up early after a summer of sleeping in, and teachers have to plan out the year and memorize a lot of new names. For science teachers in the Fort Worth school district, the first day of school on Monday also meant talking about a historic solar eclipse going on right outside.

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Women are graduating from medical school in greater numbers than ever before. In 1970, women made up under 10 percent of graduates. Today, it’s nearly 50 percent. When it comes to who is getting published in top medical journals, though, women are behind. Doctors say the gender gap in medical research isn’t just an academic concern — it has implications for our health.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Summer school’s now in session for science teachers. It’s being run by the Perot Museum of Nature and Science and Kosmos Energy. The classes target teachers who want to get their students excited about science.

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144,000 Texans sustain a traumatic brain injury each year—that’s one every 4 minutes. For those who survive there’s often cognitive and psychological difficulties, like depression or post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Brain plasticity is the idea that brains aren’t static entities but rather are constantly being reorganized when learning or experiencing novel things. Thus, it’s no surprise that aspects of poverty—crowding, violence, hunger, family instability—have been shown to change the brain for the worse and impact language, learning and attention span among kids.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

If you’re trying to combine education with entertainment this holiday season you’re not alone. The aisles of kids toys are packed with high-tech gadgets promise to challenge the mind. So which ones are good?

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There are many factors that come into play while growing up. Teenagers have a lot to think about when it comes to the future, and as recent studies have proven, the crucial influence in determining life outcomes takes place during the adolescent years. Psychology professor Laurence Steinberg joins Krys Boyd at 1 p.m. on Think to discuss these findings and how parents can update their understanding of younger generations.

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We tend to associate "studying" with “hitting the books” -- lots of discipline and focus. At 1 p.m. on Think, education reporter Benedict Carey of the New York Times explains how new brain science affirms the wandering mind over a one-track approach. His new book is called How We Learn.

Study Up For 'Think': What We See When We Read

Aug 21, 2014
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How do the words we read on a page translate into the images we see in our head? Peter Mendelsund, Associate Art Director for Alfred A. Knopf Books, joins Krys Boyd on Think today. At 1 p.m., he’ll discuss the neuroscience behind reading, which he covers in his book What We See When We Read.

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Two summers ago, the Mars Curiosity rover made its landing on the red planet. Approximately thirty-five million miles from Earth, the $2.5 billion robot has had faced its ups and downs. At noon, Marc Kaufman, author of Mars Up Close: Inside the Curiosity Mission, talks with Krys Boyd on Think about the rover’s journey so far.

The secret to more productive meetings? You might simply need to stand up.

This we know, to some degree. Just take as examples the growing popularity of standing desks, which took off after a flurry of reports found that sitting for long periods of time can significantly, negatively, impact employees' health.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

About half of the U.S workforce is female, but only 1 in 4 jobs in STEM fields go to women. We checked out a summer camp at the University of Texas at Dallas that aims to get girls excited about science, technology, engineering and math.

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While enjoying an adult beverage, one doesn’t usually pick apart chemical processes that take place in making the drink -- or even the drink's interaction with the human body. But studying both could help you recover post-cocktail. Adam Rogers, Articles Editor at Wired, joins guest host Stephen Becker on Think at 1 p.m. to discuss his new book Proof: The Science of Booze.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

Getting kids interested in science, technology, engineering and math can be a challenge for teachers. It can be even more challenging if the students are girls. That’s just one of the many topics that came up during a discussion about tomorrow’s workforce at Texas Tribune’s Symposium on STEM Education on Monday.

Tom McFadden

How do you get kids interested in science? You have them rap about it. At least that’s what some schools around the country are doing as featured in this recent NPR story. Students in the San Francisco Bay area squared off with hip-hop songs about complex science topics they researched and wrote.

Via NPR: Science Rap B.A.T.T.L.E.S. Bring Hip-Hop Into The Classroom

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

It may be the middle of summer, but it’s graduation day for dozens of teens in science camp. A six-week summer school at SMU ends today. It was built for teenage science superstars from across the country.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

A group of Texas hardware hackers and space aficionados gathered in Dallas at the Frontiers of Flight Museum this weekend. Their goal? Learn how to build experiments to take into space.

Hai-Ting Chinn sings some seriously nerdy, and beautiful, classical music. The mezzo-soprano, who in addition to singing in operas, likes to write tunes with scientific lyrics and has a podcast she co-hosts called Scopes Monkey Choir. Check out her music, courtesy of Phil Plait, the creator of Slate's Bad Astronomy.

Cracking The Code To Create Special Blood-Forming Cells

Feb 24, 2013
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In the near future, scientists may be able to reproduce blood-forming stem cells in a laboratory. That could save the lives of thousands of people suffering from diseases such as leukemia, lymphoma and other blood cancers. The Dallas doctor who's brought us closer to this reality published the breakthrough in stem cell research in the national science journal Nature.

When the X-ray was invented, people clamored to get one. Not for any medical reason, but just to see what was typically hidden inside their bodies.

Something like that seems to be happening with DNA sequencing technology. First it was companies offering to sequence people's genomes. Now it's learning all about your microbiome, the collection of microorganisms living on and in your body.

Texas police say they have arrested a man in the death of a 16-year-old girl who was expected to testify against him in an upcoming sexual assault trial.

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings has declared a state of emergency because of escalating West Nile virus cases and deaths.