school nutrition | KERA News

school nutrition

Photo: Nada Atieh

When school's out, Texas schools are giving low-income kids free meals in the summer. The problem is five out of every six kids who are eligible don’t show up. However, the Arlington school district is trying to turn that around. 

Bill Zeeble / KERA news

One in five Texas families doesn't have enough food to eat. As a result, many kids go to school hungry. That’s why school nutrition programs are so important -- and why, for the first time, the nonprofit Children At Risk, decided to rank them.

Dora Rivas made national headlines for her efforts to transform the school lunch menu. Under her watch as executive director of Food and Child Nutrition Services in Dallas ISD, students were given healthier food options.

Not All Texas School Districts Will Bring Back Sodas And Fried Foods

Jul 1, 2015
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

Students eager to purchase soda and fried foods when they return to school in the fall may be disappointed, despite Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller's recent announcement that both will be welcome back on Texas public school campuses after a 10-year ban. 

A little more than 10 years ago, Texas banned soda machines and deep fryers in public school cafeterias.

Now the state's current agriculture commissioner, Sid Miller, wants to do away with that ban. He believes these kinds of restrictions should be in the hands of local school boards — not state regulators. But some students are among those who aren't happy about this idea.

shutterstock

What kids eat before school can greatly impact how they perform in the classroom.

In this edition of Vital Signs, Navin Hariprasad, a nutritionist and Operations Manager of Patient Food Services at Parkland Hospital, explains the difference a healthy breakfast and a balanced diet throughout the day can make.

Dallas Independent School District

Every Dallas ISD student will be able to eat breakfast and lunch for free, the district announced Tuesday.

Nearly 90 percent of students in Dallas public schools qualified for free and reduced-priced meals last year, and district officials say about that many could be eligible this year. Processing that many meal applications costs money, so the district is changing the program by offering free breakfast and lunch to all of its students.

At least 165,000 low income kids in Dallas don’t need to go hungry this summer. That’s because there’s free breakfast and lunch for those 18 and under all across Dallas county, for children who usually get free food at school.

 

Texas ranks near the bottom when it comes to states getting nutritious, summer meals to low-income students. Many contend that it doesn't need to be that way, because free meals are offered to all North Texans 18 or under.

The Dallas school district’s free summer meals program starts today.

The summer food service program is set up to feed nutritious meals to all Dallas youth 18 and younger through much of the summer, regardless of family income. That’s because, as the district says, hunger doesn’t take a summer break. To eat, just show up.