school finance | KERA News

school finance

From Texas Standard:

One issue that's been top priority during the special legislative session is school finance. On Thursday, nearly 1,500 school officials sent a letter to Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick urging him to support the primary legislation that deals with school finance, House Bill 21, which passed out of the House on Monday. The Senate's Education Committee heard testimony on HB 21 Friday.

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

The Texas House on Friday passed a package of bills that would put $1.8 billion into public schools and help out struggling small, rural school districts.

From Texas Standard:

After months of back and forth over how to fix what ails funding for Texas schools, lawmakers argued late into the night, Wednesday over a bill that would pump more state money into school budgets statewide. In the end, members of the House and Senate couldn't see eye to eye on what to leave in the bill to make school financing more equitable statewide.

School Finance Legislation Is Pronounced Dead

May 24, 2017
Bob Daemmrich for the Texas Tribune

An effort to overhaul the state’s beleaguered school finance system has been declared dead after the Texas Senate Education Committee’s chairman said Wednesday that he would not appoint conferees to negotiate with the House.

Straus Orders Texas House To Study School Finance

Jun 2, 2016
Casey Chapman Ross / Texas Tribune

Citing a recent Texas Supreme Court decision that upheld the state’s public school funding system while deeming it “undeniably imperfect," state House Speaker Joe Straus on Thursday ordered representatives to study the school finance system and recommend reforms before the 2017 legislative session.

Photo illustration by Todd Wiseman / Jason Unbound / The Texas Tribune

Updated to include statements from the governor, attorney general: The Texas Supreme Court on Friday issued a ruling upholding the state’s public school funding system as constitutional, while asserting it could be better. 

State Asks Supreme Court To Drop School Finance Lawsuit

Sep 2, 2015
Shawn Hempel / Shutterstock.com

“Money isn’t pixie dust” when it comes to improving public schools, lawyers for the state of Texas told the state Supreme Court on Tuesday, arguing an appeal in what has been described as the most far-reaching school finance case in state history.

Texas Supreme Court Hearing School Finance Appeal

Sep 1, 2015
Todd Wiseman / Damian Gadal / Robert Couse-Baker / Texas Tribune photo illustration

The Texas Supreme Court is hearing oral arguments Tuesday morning in what some have called the most far-reaching school finance lawsuit in state history.

Texas Tribune

Gov. Greg Abbott got most of what he wanted out of his first legislative session as the state's chief executive.  However, not all Republicans share his enthusiasm.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

School districts throughout the state are applauding a court ruling that may eventually lead to an overhaul of the way Texas pays for schools.

On Thursday State District Judge John Dietz again declared the state’s school funding system unconstitutional.

Shawn Hempel / Shutterstock

A judge has again declared Texas' school finance system unconstitutional, reaffirming his 2013 decision despite $3.4 billion in extra classroom funding approved by the Legislature last summer. 

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

A judge who declared the Texas school funding system unconstitutional will hear more evidence Tuesday before entering his final, written ruling. 

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

School districts and their lawyers hope a state judge’s ruling will force Texas to spend more money on public education.

Sara Robberson / Special to KERA

District Judge John Dietz has ruled the Texas school finance system, which serves over 5 million public schoolchildren, is unconstitutional. 

“The court declares the school finance system  is not adequately funded and therefore fails to make suitable provision for the support and maintenance of the system,” Dietz said Monday, explaining one of the reasons he ruled against the state. 

Dallas, TX – Texas school districts say they're struggling after lawmakers cut more than $4 billion from the education budget earlier this year. Some, like Cedar Hill, tried making up the loss with a tax. Hundreds of other districts are now preparing to sue the state like they did a decade ago, to restore funding. KERA's Bill Zeeble reports.