restaurants | KERA News

restaurants

Christopher Connelly/KERA News

Restaurants come and go all the time, but in Fort Worth’s West Seventh district, a taqueria is going a bit beyond a simple relocation. It’s moving an entire building, complete with its concrete slab, all the way across town. It’s a slow process — one that's weeks in the making and will take days to complete — but it’s a labor of love.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

They’ve earned the catchy nickname of “breastaurants” -- casual dining chains like Hooters, Twin Peaks and Tilted Kilt Pub. These restaurants do well in Texas. This year, a new restaurant opened in Dallas, and instead of female waitresses wearing miniskirts, it features male waiters in bikini shorts.

From Texas Standard:

The morning routine of Kai Alterman includes a stop at a café and a cab ride. When it comes time for her to pay,  the server slides her credit card, then hands her a screen similar to an iPad to sign – complete with choices of how much to tip. Alterman hits the middle option, leaving a 20 percent tip.

"I think this makes people tip more often, because you feel more guilty not to tip with those," Alterman says.

 


A Fort Worth business owner is working tirelessly to make sure her employees don’t fall over the financial edge. She makes it her mission to employ, educate, and embrace each and every one of her staff members.

lucyd / flickr

After a cab driver refused gratuity in Singapore, where tipping any service or food worker is not encouraged, New York magazine’s Adam Platt decided he’d try to stop tipping when he returned to the U.S. and see what happened. 

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Pizza Hut, the nation’s biggest pizza chain, is overhauling its brand. There’s a new logo, a more casual uniform, and fresh leadership. But the biggest upgrade is the menu.  

Dane Walters / KERA News

Café Momentum has been hosting once-a-month pop-up dinners in various locations for three years, but it will finally have a permanent home.

You know how frustrating it is when you can't catch your waiter's eye? He may be thinking the same thing about you.

Diners distracted by their phones have become a real pain in the restaurant business, interfering with the flow of transactions and generally slowing things down.

"I would say probably 7 out of 10 people play with their phones throughout their meals," says Catherine Roberts, general manager of Hogs and Rocks, a ham and oyster bar in San Francisco's Mission District. "People are definitely on their phones excessively. It does gum things up."

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Residents near Dallas’ White Rock Lake unloaded on developers Tuesday night as they pitched their plan for building a restaurant in the park at a location known as Boy Scout Hill.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

A standing-room only crowd is expected Tuesday night when developers try to sell East Dallas residents on their plan to build a restaurant in White Rock Lake Park. So far, opposition from those living near the lake has been loud and far outweighs any visible community support.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Can food revitalize an ailing neighborhood? In Dallas, global flavors seem to be playing a pretty big part in one area's transformation.

For decades, West Dallas was a ramshackle place: a Superfund site with a cement plant, some crime-ridden warehouses and a modest Latino neighborhood known as La Bajada across a potholed two-lane bridge from glittery downtown.

Now there's a soaring new bridge, the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge, that some called the "Bridge to Nowhere." But with a dozen new restaurants, nowhere is becoming somewhere.

Texas Monthly

Five stories that have North Texas talking: some of the best places to eat are in Big D; today is primary day; a very old map of Texas will be put up for auction; and more.

Shutterstock

That burrito on the kids menu? Not as healthy as you might have thought. According to a new study by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, every single children's meal offered at chains such as Chipotle, Panda Express, Dairy Queen, and Hardee's fell short of standards adopted by the center from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's nutritional recommendations. 

Dane Walters / KERA News

Meet Leonardo Alvarez, who spent much of his youth, as he puts it, “dealing dope.” That landed him in Dallas’ Youth Village juvenile detention center. He’s been through the Café Momentum program, which teaches young men how to work in restaurants.

In this video Leonardo talks about his girlfriend’s pregnancy, his legal stumbles and his struggle to stay on the straight and narrow.

Dane Walters / KERA News

Café Momentum has some of the hardest tables to book in Dallas. The once-a-month pop-up dinners sell out fast at $100 a plate. They’re held at hot restaurants around the city. They feature gourmet menus, top-notch table service and high-profile chefs who work side-by-side with eight kids who provide an unexpected twist: All eight are incarcerated at a Dallas County juvenile detention center.