psychology | KERA News

psychology

James Pennebaker

Social psychologist James Pennebaker wanted to know which small words can out a liar. He began by inspecting recommendation letters he wrote. Some were for students he was genuinely fond of; others, simply favors. He told Think host Krys Boyd the results of that study and others are consistent with three common features of untrue speech or writing found in research for The Secret Life Of Pronouns. 

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Never tell a despairing person your philosophy of happiness.  Action items - ways to max out everyday life with gratitude and compassion - are worth more, when it counts the most. We heard a shortlist from Dr. Amit Sood, author of The Mayo Clinic Guide to Stress-Free Living in January, and he was back on Think earlier this week. 

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If you've never been able to get out of bed for a morning run, keep your place clean or give up fast food, it might be time to stop wallowing in guilt and find out why.

Study Up For Think: Accuracy, The Enemy Of Groupthink

Jan 21, 2015
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Groupthink occurs when a set of people prioritize harmony and group cohesiveness over accuracy and diversity. At 1 p.m., Krys Boyd will chat with Cass Sunstein, co-author of Wiser: Getting Beyond Groupthink to Make Groups Smarter.

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In our culture, people battling certain diseases are seen as brave and heroic, while others can be viewed as weak or morally lacking. Today on Think, Krys Boyd talked to a panel of mental health experts to find out why we’re compelled to judge people based on certain health conditions.

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There are many factors that come into play while growing up. Teenagers have a lot to think about when it comes to the future, and as recent studies have proven, the crucial influence in determining life outcomes takes place during the adolescent years. Psychology professor Laurence Steinberg joins Krys Boyd at 1 p.m. on Think to discuss these findings and how parents can update their understanding of younger generations.

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It's not just the pursuit of more money that can buy unhappiness. We could be funding our misery with the hard-earned cash we already have. 

Elizabeth Dunn, associate professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, studied how spending habits bear on quality of life for her book "Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending." We revisit her conversation with Krys Boyd at noon on KERA 90.1 FM for our series "Best of Think 2013."

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Dissecting prejudice is about as easy as picking apart a pomegranate. It’s a messy task that researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington have been working on for years.

As far back as he can remember, George McCann lived in fear. When he was asleep he would have horrific nightmares filled with violent images. When he was awake, he often felt threatened by people, including members of his own family. And when he felt threatened, he would become aggressive, even violent.

George spent his childhood certain that something very bad was going to happen. And when he was 12, it did. His unrelenting fears led to a violent outburst at school. And George landed in a psychiatric hospital.

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Seeing or hearing things that aren’t actually there? Up to ten percent of the general population is, and they aren't all mentally ill, says Dr. Oliver Sacks. He’s a professor of neurology at the NYU School of Medicine and author of the new book Hallucinations. Think host Krys Boyd explores the nuance of this widely recognized symptom of psychiatric disorders with Sacks today at 1 p.m.