pregnancy | KERA News

pregnancy

The end of this year’s legislative session is a little more than a week away, and health advocates say lawmakers are missing an opportunity to deal with a public health crisis in the state.

Last year, researchers reported a sharp spike between 2010 and 2012 in the number of women in Texas who died while pregnant or soon after giving birth, but they don’t know why.

Courtney Collins / KERA news

Education and earning potential both suffer when teens have babies—and one North Texas nonprofit is challenging students to think about how their life would change with a child to care for-- by hosting a film competition.

More New Mothers in Texas are Dying; Experts Can't Say Why

Sep 6, 2016
Philippe Put / The Texas Tribune

No matter which way you count, the number of Texas women dying after they have babies or unsuccessful pregnancies is on the rise.

Shutterstock

Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas hopes to become one of the first hospitals in the U.S. to transplant a uterus from one woman to another.

Texas Will Begin Tracking Pregnant Foster Youth

Jan 8, 2016
Philippe Put / Texas Tribune

The teenage pregnancy rate in the United States, including Texas, continues to fall, according to a recent report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Bloody Marty / flickr

Alexandra Kleeman wanted to know what Victorian women went through when their doctors ordered them to stay still. So, she put herself on strict bed rest for five days at a convent in Washington. 

Shutterstock

Along with the news of the Duchess of Cambridge expecting her second child came word of another bout of severe morning sickness. 75-percent of pregnant women experience some form of nausea and/or vomiting in the first trimester, likely related to hormonal change from pregnancy. In this edition of Vital Signs, Dr. David Nelson, an OB/GYN at Parkland Hospital, explains the former Kate Middleton’s situation isn’t unusual.

Shutterstock

Despite prenatal care, around five percent of women will develop diabetes during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is a temporary, but potentially serious problem.  

In this edition of Vital Signs, Dr. Brian Casey, an obstetrician with Parkland Hospital, explains gestational diabetes is part of the physiology of pregnancy.

Shutterstock

Americans consume a lot of salt. But a new study published in Pediatrics says many women who are pregnant or breast feeding aren’t getting enough iodine found in salt and other foods. In this segment of Vital Signs, Dr. Sheri Puffer of Texas Health Arlington Hospital explains what’s causing the deficiency and why iodine’s important.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Let me say off the top that I’m not complaining. No new mom getting as much nighttime sleep as I am has the right to complain. I’m lucky, I know I am. My 10-week-old only wakes up once to eat between 10 p.m. and 9 a.m.  And it has been like that for a while now. I dare to say it feels like a pattern; almost a schedule. But when the sun comes up in earnest, my little guy is ready to party. All day long.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

In the days leading up to the birth of my son, I had a gut feeling it would be a breeze. My mom, after all, was only in labor for seven hours total with three children. And four of those hours were with me, the most stubborn of the Collins kids.

My pregnancy had been easy: I was a week overdue, but worked my normal schedule until the day before my doctor wanted to induce. A lot of first-time moms need drugs to get labor started; induction is downright commonplace. The birth part was going to follow suit; I just knew it.

Shutterstock

Stroke has a large negative impact on society, with women disproportionately affected. An estimated 6.8 million people in the United States are living after having had a stroke, including 3.8 million women and three million men. Stroke is the fifth-leading cause of death for men, but the third leading cause for women. So says the American Heart Association this month in its newly released guidelines for prevention of stroke in women.

Facebook

A state district judge has ruled that Marlise Muñoz, the brain-dead North Texas woman who’s 22 weeks pregnant, must be removed from life support by 5 p.m. Monday.

The decision Friday afternoon comes after John Peter Smith Hospital declared publicly for the first time that Muñoz has indeed been brain dead since late November. The hospital also says the fetus inside Muñoz is "not viable."

For weeks, hospital officials had said she isn’t dead and that her condition is serious.

The case of the Texas woman, 22 weeks pregnant and being kept on life-support machines at a Forth Worth hospital against her husband's wishes, goes before a judge in North Texas on Friday.

Marlise Munoz has been on respirators and ventilators since she was found unconscious in her home in November, when she was 14 weeks pregnant.

Facebook

Attorneys for the husband of a pregnant North Texas woman being kept on life support say the fetus inside of her is "distinctly abnormal."

Erick Munoz's attorneys said in a statement Wednesday that the fetus that Marlise Munoz is carrying has several "abnormalities," including a deformation of the lower body parts that make it impossible to determine its gender.

Facebook

A different judge will consider a North Texas man's request to remove his pregnant, brain-dead wife from life support at a hospital.

A hearing has been scheduled Friday before state District Judge R.H. Wallace in Fort Worth in the case of Marlise Munoz, the North Texas pregnant woman who's been on life support.

Facebook

The judge in the case of a hospital's refusal to remove a pregnant North Texas patient from life support has recused herself from hearing the suit filed by the woman’s family.

State District Judge Melody Wilkinson recused herself Thursday from the lawsuit over the status of Marlise Muñoz. Wilkinson has offered no explanation.

Meanwhile, attorneys representing the Muñoz family say that medical records released by John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth confirm that Marlise Muñoz is brain dead.

Facebook

The husband of a pregnant North Texas woman on life support is suing the hospital to have her removed from life support.

A lawsuit filed Tuesday in state district court asks a judge to order John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth to remove life support for Marlise Muñoz, a Haltom City woman who fell unconscious in November while pregnant.

YouCaring.com

Five stories that have North Texas talking: the suspicious death of a girl about to turn 3, the Southwest Airlines jet that landed at the wrong airport in Missouri, the political debate raging around a pregnant Haltom City woman who's on life support and more.

Death seems one of life's few certainties, but the cases of a girl and a young woman who are being kept on life support even though they are legally dead show how difficult it still can be to agree on the end of life.

Lewis Collins

In 1981, before maternity blogs with snappy names like “Pregnant Chicken,” a young mom-to-be wrote a column for her local newspaper.

Reporter Mary Alice Collins loved crafting stories about Lamaze class, uninvited parenting advice and that magical day when baby made her way into the world. Thirty-two years later, our own Courtney Collins pores over her mom’s articles, looking for guidance and compassion as she prepares to welcome her first child in March.

Shutterstock

It contributes greatly to a successful pregnancy, but not all moms-to-be receive prenatal care. Those who do sometimes overlook common warning signs during pregnancy. Dr. Wayne Farley is Medical Director of the Advanced Maternal and Newborn Institute at Medical City in Dallas. In a Health Checkup, Dr. Farley described some of those.