police violence | KERA News

police violence

Elizabeth Myong / KERA News special contributor

Researchers in Texas and Florida have released a study on use-of-force incidents within the Dallas Police Department, and they found that white police officers in Dallas do not use force disproportionately against minorities.

From Texas Standard:

Five seconds and 50,000 volts – that's enough of a jolt to hijack your nervous system and contract every muscle in your body. Applying electricity in this way has become the tool of choice for police officers across the country. We're talking about conducted electrical weapons, better-known as tasers. They've rapidly moved from an obscure police technology, into the public consciousness. They've been hailed by law enforcement as a life-saving tool. But some critics say that's far from the case.

Lee Merritt / Facebook

Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price said in a news conference Friday systemic changes need to be made to the police department in light of the viral video that showed a white officer wrestling a black woman and her daughter to the ground.

The Washington Firm / YouTube

A police dashcam video released five months after a Texas officer shot a black man appears to show the man walking away as the officer fired, and the man's lawyer says he was not a threat.

Joyce Marshall/The Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Fort Worth officials are calling for patience during the ongoing investigation of a viral video of a white Fort Worth police officer wrestling a black woman to the ground before arresting her and her teenage daughters.

Porsha Craver / Facebook

Fort Worth police are investigating a white officer shown in a viral video wrestling a black woman to the ground Wednesday before arresting her and her teenage daughters.

What began as a dispute over littering rapidly escalated into the arrest of a black woman and her two daughters Wednesday in Fort Worth, Texas. The incident was captured on video and has sparked an internal affairs inquiry into the white police officer who forcefully arrested the women.

This week, in an American Graduate series called “The First Week,” we’ve been listening to conversations about race after a summer of racial turmoil in America and police shootings in Dallas. We’ve heard from parents, students and a teacher. Today, it's Gregg Anderson, a school resource officer who’s building relationships in the  Carrollton-Farmers Branch school district.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Over the next five days, in a series called "The First Week," we’ll listen in on the conversations students, parents, educators and police officers are having after a summer of racial turmoil in the U.S. and police shootings in Dallas. First, we look at race through the perspective of a black family in Arlington.

Four Ways Americans Can Unite In Spite Of Recent Violence

Jul 18, 2016
Shutterstock

Violence across the country this summer — in Orlando, Dallas and Baton Rouge – along with videos of shootings of civilians by police has many Americans on edge. Today on Think, Krys Boyd spoke with Washington University associate law professor John Inazu about ways to bridge the current divides within American society. John Inazu is the author of, “Confident Pluralism: Surviving and Thriving Through Deep Difference.”

LM Otero / Associated Press

Lt. Governor Dan Patrick tells Texas Standard why there’s a need to improve positive relations between police officers and the public.

BJ Austin / KERA News

Dozens of students in Lancaster took evening classes Wednesday night on how to interact with police. 

Neff Conner, flickr.com

A federal civil rights complaint was filed Thursday against the city of Dallas and the Dallas Police Department.  The group Dallas Communities Organizing for Change wants the Justice Department to investigate use of excessive force by Dallas police officers.

Pablo Pena / KERA News

The ripples of tension that began in Ferguson, Missouri 12 days ago are being felt in North Texas.

There have been town hall meetings, heated exchanges and several protests.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Imagine seeing your parent shot to death in what may have been a misunderstanding because of race. That’s the story of one woman who has helped organized a conversation about race and education. It took place Thursday night in Dallas at the Bishop Arts Theatre Arts Center.