One Crisis Away | KERA News

One Crisis Away

KERA’s One Crisis Away project focuses a spotlight on North Texans living on the financial edge both in weekly stories and regular in-depth series.

A scene from West Dallas near Singleton Boulevard.
Credit Allison V. Smith / KERA News special contributor

A job loss, health emergency, even legal trouble can be enough to plunge a third of our friends and neighbors into financial distress. One Crisis Away puts a human face on asset poverty and the financial struggles of people in Dallas-Fort Worth.  

Explore multimedia projects: No Place To Go, a deep dive into affordable housing and gentrification in West Dallas; Rebuilding A Life, a series about North Texans recovering from devastating tornadoes; Drowning In Debt, stories about and resources for living with financial burden; and more.

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This week, KERA kicks off a new multimedia initiative called One Crisis Away, which looks at North Texas families living with asset poverty. On this hour of Think, Krys Boyd discussed financial literacy with YWCA of Dallas CEO Jennifer Ware and Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Greater Dallas‘ Todd Mark.

Dane Walters / KERA News

The Madrids look like a lot of families in North Texas; a married couple in their 20s with a young child and a house in Rockwall.  Then a health emergency turned their world upside down.

The Madrids are the first family we’re profiling in KERA’s new series One Crisis Away. A third of North Texans don’t have enough savings to cover a three month financial disruption, which means folks like the Madrids are living on the edge.

KERA's new series One Crisis Away looks at four families on the financial edge. In the first profile, meet Isac Madrid, his wife Elizabeth and their 1-year-old son. Eighteen months ago, they had two incomes and a savings account. Now, after a medical setback, they're barely hanging on financially.

Learn more about the Madrid family.

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One out of every three North Texans is walking a financial tightrope and could be knocked off by just one crisis; a medical emergency, an eviction, a job loss.

In KERA’s new series One Crisis Away,  we introduce a concept known as asset poverty.

“This really measures the ability of a household to exist at the poverty level for just three months if their main source of income is disrupted,” says Andrea Levere, president of the Corporation for Enterprise Development.

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Four in ten people in Dallas are at risk of financial disaster. They live in “asset poverty” according to a new study. KERA’s BJ Austin reports.

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