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NPR Chief News Editor David Sweeney has left the company following allegations of sexual harassment filed against him by at least three female journalists.

"David Sweeney is no longer on staff," Chris Turpin, acting senior vice president of news, said in an email to staff.

"This is a difficult time for our newsroom and I'm committed to supporting all of you as we move forward. I know you appreciate that there are some questions I cannot answer in keeping with our practice to not comment on personnel issues, but I will do my best to address those I can," Turpin added.

As NPR's Board of Directors meet in Washington, D.C., this week, the network finds itself confronted by a series of dispiriting developments: a CEO on medical leave; a chief news executive forced out over sexual harassment allegations; the sudden resignation of a board chairman; fresh complaints over inappropriate behavior by colleagues; and a network roiled by tensions over the treatment of its female workers.

NPR CEO Jarl Mohn is going on medical leave for at least one month.

It comes less than a week after the ouster of NPR's head of news, Michael Oreskes, over sexual harassment allegations by multiple women.

NPR CEO Jarl Mohn apologized to angered staffers in a contentious meeting Friday afternoon even as additional women accused the network's former top news executive of sexually harassing them.

"I've let you down," Mohn said, according to people present. "I should have acted sooner and I should have acted more forcefully."

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

NPR's senior vice president for news, Michael Oreskes, has resigned following allegations of sexual harassment from several women.

The accounts of two women, first published by The Washington Post, describe Oreskes unexpectedly kissing them during meetings in the late 1990s, while he was Washington bureau chief for The New York Times. An NPR employee has also come forward publicly about harassment that allegedly occurred during a business meeting-turned-dinner in 2015.

NPR has placed its senior vice president for news, Michael Oreskes, on leave after fielding accusations that he sexually harassed two women seeking career opportunities nearly two decades ago, when he worked at The New York Times.

I spotted Jacque Ooko's mettle as a journalist on my first assignment in Nairobi, Kenya. We were at a rural hospital outside the city, in the middle of a doctors strike. As people writhed in pain, desperate for medical attention, she had somehow talked the only administrator in the place into letting us in and then started talking to all the patients.

NPR journalists David Gilkey and Zabihullah Tamanna died a year ago this week, ambushed on a remote road in southern Afghanistan while on a reporting assignment traveling with the Afghan National Army.

Since their deaths, NPR has been investigating what happened, and today we are sharing new information about what we learned. It's a very different story from what we originally understood.

Robert Siegel's voice and signature reporting have been an essential part of NPR since he first arrived in Washington in 1976. He has been with NPR for more than 40 years, a constant presence in our newsroom and a familiar voice to so many listeners. After one of the most storied careers in NPR's history, Robert has decided to step down as the host of All Things Considered in January 2018.

Quick quiz: What do Judy Garland's rendition of "Over the Rainbow," N.W.A's seminal Straight Outta Compton and the inaugural episode of NPR's All Things Considered have in common?

That little riddle just got a little easier to answer on Wednesday: The Library of Congress announced that all three "aural treasures" — along with roughly two dozen other recordings — have been inducted into its National Recording Registry.

There's an active debate inside newsrooms, and particularly within the NPR newsroom, about how to characterize the statements of President Trump when they are at odds with evidence to the contrary.

NPR remembered colleagues David Gilkey and Zabihullah Tamanna at a memorial service at Washington, D.C.'s Newseum on Tuesday morning. Gilkey, an NPR photojournalist, was killed in Afghanistan on June 5 with Tamanna, NPR's Afghan interpreter and a fellow journalist. As NPR's The Two-Way reported, "David and Zabihullah were on assignment for the network traveling with an Afghan army unit.

Updated 3:15 a.m. ET

David Gilkey, an NPR photojournalist who chronicled pain and beauty in war and conflict, was killed in Afghanistan on Sunday along with NPR's Afghan interpreter Zabihullah Tamanna.

The leading candidates for the Republican and Democratic nomination for president – Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton - disagree on just about everything. Everything, it seems, except the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Stephen Voss / NPR

Jarl Mohn is just two weeks away from the anniversary of getting the top job at NPR. For this week’s Friday Conversation, he talks about his first year at the network, what he learned from running E! Entertainment television, and how he hopes to position NPR in a radically changing media landscape.

Shutterstock

Concussions, domestic violence, performance-enhancing drugs, and now “deflate gate.” With the Super Bowl just days away, football may be drawing more attention off the field than on.

NPR’s Michel Martin is in town to host an event about football and ethics at the Perot Museum Tuesday night and she sat down with KERA’s vice president of news Rick Holter.

Meredith Rizzo / NPR

The topic for this week’s Friday Conversation is the militarization of language. KERA’s vice president of news, Rick Holter, goes into the trenches with Mark Memmott, standards and practices editor for NPR.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

If anyone still thinks the sports world is just about the scoreboard, they haven't been watching too closely.

Correspondent Tom Goldman chronicles the sports world for NPR.

Sarah Tilotta / NPR

"Tell Me More" airs for the last time on KERA 90.1 FM at 8 p.m. Friday. NPR has canceled the show after a seven-year run. 

KERA

Friday’s a big day for KERA-FM – we’re celebrating our 40th anniversary. And we've been searching our archives to dust off some history. 

On July 11, 1974, KERA went on the air as the first full-time public radio station or North Texas.

NPR announced Tuesday that it would cease broadcast of the weekday program Tell Me More on Aug. 1 and eliminate 28 positions as part of a larger effort to end the company's persistent budget deficits.

Media industry veteran Jarl Mohn will be NPR's new CEO, the organization's board of directors has announced.

Mohn, 62, currently sits on the board of directors at several media organizations, including Scripps Networks Interactive and Web analytics company ComScore. He is also on the boards of KPCC Southern California Public Radio and the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

Announcing the hire, Kit Jensen, who chairs NPR's board of directors, said Mohn has "an ability to find nuanced and new ideas." He is slated to start work at NPR on July 1.

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

NPR’s “All Things Considered” is broadcasting from Dallas all week and focusing on Texas, from demographic changes to televangelists.

The afternoon news magazine kicked off its coverage with an interview with Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings.

Dallas has changed through the years, but people can’t shake certain stereotypes of Big D. Rawlings is trying to change that.

Ron Doke/Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cobalt220/

What does the country think of Dallas?

(And, this being Dallas, we really do care what the rest of the country thinks of us. We might say we don’t care. But, deep down, we do.)

NPR journalists went to a Metro subway stop in Washington, D.C., where they saw a pair of posters “tempting passengers with images of a cosmopolitan city, an upscale arts district, a modern sports stadium.”

The poster's slogan is "Dallas: Big Things Happen Here." The reaction?

TBS/Conan O'Brien

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Coco is here!; NPR is here!; NBC is here!; and more.

Mihai Andritoiu / Shutterstock.com

It’s not quite like Pee Wee’s adventure through Texas. (No, there’s no basement in the Alamo.) But NPR has been exploring the Lone Star state in recent weeks – and the network is invading North Texas all week long, broadcasting “All Things Considered,” the afternoon news magazine, from the KERA Newsroom in Dallas.

D. Robert Wolcheck / NPR

NPR will soon have a new voice.

Come November, NPR listeners will hear a new voice saying things such as "Support for NPR comes from..." and "This [pause] is NPR."

Sabrina Farhi is joining NPR in Washington, D.C., as the network's announcer alongside the iconic Frank Tavares, who has voiced NPR's funding credits for more than three decades. You'll get to know her quickly once her voice comes on the air in November.

Saying that the goal is to balance its budget in fiscal year 2015, NPR announced late Friday morning that it will soon offer "a voluntary buyout plan across the organization that reduces staffing levels by approximately 10 percent."

After fewer than 21 months on the job, NPR CEO Gary Knell announced at mid-day Monday that he's leaving the organization to become president and CEO at the National Geographic Society.

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