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national security

Updated at 5:51 p.m. ET

President Trump is responding to the backlash against the allegations that he shared "highly classified" information with the Russians by saying he had "the absolute right to do" so.

He tweeted Tuesday morning:

And he went a step further, again taking aim at fired former FBI Director James Comey and "leakers":

Updated at 9:45 p.m. ET

President Trump revealed "highly classified information" to two top Russian officials during a controversial Oval Office meeting last week, according to a report from The Washington Post.

President Trump's budget blueprint is all about "hard power" — increasing the country's military might by slashing foreign aid. The proposed cuts are in contrast to the dramatic boost to foreign aid under President George W. Bush.

In Shake Up, Rick Perry Moves Into Trump's National Security Inner Circle

Apr 5, 2017
Carlos Barria / Reuters

WASHINGTON -  A new memorandum Wednesday revealed that U.S. Secretary of Energy Rick Perry will be added to President Donald Trump's National Security Council, the chief executive's main advisory group on intelligence and defense matters.   

Updated at 12:59 p.m. ET

Steve Bannon has been removed from his controversial role on the National Security Council just months after he was elevated to the position.

President Trump's chief strategist will no longer be a regular attendee of the principals committee of the NSC, but he will retain his role as senior adviser for domestic affairs.

Michael Flynn Resigns As Trump's National Security Adviser

Feb 14, 2017

Updated at 9:59 a.m. ET Feb. 14

President Trump's national security adviser Michael Flynn resigned late Monday night amid allegations he inappropriately talked about U.S. sanctions with a Russian official, and later allegedly misled then-Vice President-elect Pence about the conversations. Flynn spoke with the Russian ambassador in December, before Trump was inaugurated.

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

The Orlando nightclub shooting has prompted businesses across the country and in North Texas to boost security. In Dallas, police are working with the FBI to watch over entertainment districts, like gay-friendly Oak Lawn. But some national security experts argue ramping up security in everyday spots may not be the most effective solution.

Susan Melkisethian / flickr

The government and the press butt heads over access to intelligence often. Krys Boyd will speak to Stephen Whitfield, American studies professor at Brandeis University, about finding the equilibrium between national security and freedom of the press at 1 p.m. today.