Mexico | KERA News

Mexico

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

More than 600 Latino high school students from North and Central America are in Dallas for the annual meeting of the National Hispanic Institute. The organization was created to foster future Hispanic leaders, like A.C. Gonazlez, the Dallas city manager and an Institute alum. Meet some of the next generation.  

Bob Booth / Special to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Three men are accused of stalking an attorney from Mexico to Southlake using video cameras and photographs before gunning him down in a shopping center parking lot.

Mariachi music has a long history, dating back to 18th century Mexico. How do you get the younger generation interested in this old tradition of guitar strumming, violin playing and passionate singing? We checked out a mariachi summer camp for middle and high school kids at the University of North Texas at Denton.

R. Snow / Ocearch.org

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Tracking Katharine the shark; Big Tex is America’s quirkiest landmark; Phil Collins is making a big donation to the Alamo; and more.

The new FX series The Bridge begins with the discovery of a body on a bridge that connects El Paso, Texas, and Juarez, Mexico. In it, a Mexican detective, played by Mexican actor Demian Bichir, has to work with an El Paso homicide cop to solve what turns out to be a serial murder case.

(Mexican Navy/AFP)

One of Mexico’s most wanted drug lords was captured near the border Monday night – and he has deep roots in North Texas. Miguel Angel Trevino Morales, the leader of the brutal Zetas drug cartel, was taken into custody near Nuevo Laredo. KERA’s Lauren Silverman called Alfredo Corchado, who’s in Mexico City covering the case for the Dallas Morning News, to talk about Trevino Morales’ links to Dallas.

Latin Drug Bosses And Their Growing American Ties

Jul 16, 2013

Latin American cartels are fueled by U.S. drug demand, so their illegal retail networks often stretch throughout America. Mexico's arrest of Miguel Angel Trevino Morales was a reminder that the connections between drug traffickers and the U.S. are not just commercial — they're also personal.

The U.S.-Mexico border plays a starring role in the new FX series The Bridge.

Characters in the television crime drama, which premieres Wednesday night, regularly cross back and forth through the border between El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. The show's dialogue also frequently switches between English and Spanish, setting a new standard for bilingual drama on American television.

When Alfredo Corchado went to cover Mexico for The Dallas Morning News, he was determined not to focus on drugs and crime but rather to cover issues critical to the country's future — immigration, education and the economy.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Dallas Fire-Rescue officials say an electrical short caused a fire Monday that destroyed Luna’s Tortilla Factory on Harry Hines Boulevard. They say the short happened "in or near the neon Luna's sign on the South side of the building," and that the fire then raced through the attic. No one was injured in the fire.

The Department of Homeland Security is examining its policy on deadly force along the U.S.-Mexico border. In less than two years, U.S. Border Patrol agents have killed 18 Mexican citizens there — including eight people who were throwing rocks.

Seth Sawyers / (cc) flickr

Teachers and parents say they don't know why Texas' public schools have the lowest percentage of special education students of any state in the country.

Matt Katzenberger / (cc) flickr

A strong, long 7.6 earthquake with an epicenter in Guerrero state shook central southern Mexico on Tuesday, swaying buildings in Mexico City and sending frightened workers and residents into the streets.

Caribbean Free Photo

Spring Break is right around the corner for Texas students — but a traditional destination is off limits this year.

KERA's Courtney Collins takes us to a kitchen in Garland where Koni Ramo Kaiwi is trying to preserve one of her holiday traditions. Bunuelos have long been on the holiday menu in many Latino homes. Koni wants to make sure her grandchildren can recreate their magic for holidays to come.

Armed with rolling pins and a mission Koni Ramos Kaiwi hands each of her three grandchildren a kitchen tool and a ball of sweet, homemade dough.

She then instructs the children to roll the dough flat and thin, until it's about the size of a tortilla.

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