media literacy | KERA News

media literacy

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A team of researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington is developing algorithms to detect automated accounts — also known as "bots" — that spread misinformation online.

The project focuses on Twitter bots that spread fake news and their threat to national security. But identifying the characteristics of these bots can help the everyday social media user, too.

Here's the biggest understatement of the year: 2016 was the most disruptive moment the mainstream American news media have faced in a very long time.

That's not because so many media outlets misread the presidential election, although that is part of it. And it's not just because so-called "fake news" has become a genuine issue, prompting Facebook and other social media outlets to address fraudulent items formatted to look like legitimate news reports — a long-needed change.

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A recent study from Stanford University found most teenagers couldn’t tell the difference between fake and credible news. That problem isn't limited to teens, though. Leading up to and after the election of Donald Trump, there’s been growing criticism over fake and hyper-partisan news sites. Overwhelmed social media users have even begun to cut back on their Facebook habits.