Latinos | KERA News

Latinos

Shelley Kofler, KERA

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade. In this installment of the series, Texas 2020, we look at how the deep roots of Lone Star Latinos create a different racial calculus than in other states -- and meet three generations of one North Texas family.

Lauren Silverman

Ana Reyes will make history in the city of Farmers Branch when she is sworn in as the first Hispanic member on an all-white city council. Reyes defeated William Capener 63 to 37 to win the district one seat.

BdwayDiva1 / Flickr

A record number of Hispanic high school graduates enrolled in college last fall outpacing their white counterparts, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center.

Using U.S. Census data, the study found that seven in 10 Hispanic students, or 69 percent, who graduated in 2012 went on to college compared to 67 percent of white students.

By 2030, nearly six million Latinos will be obese, according to The Texas State Demographer’s office. KUT's Veronica Zaragovia reports local communities are trying to raise awareness and shrink waistlines.

Dynamic engagement is behind a boom in Latino-produced online media. One example: Texas blogger Armando Rayo calls himself a “taco journalist.” He explains how his dual heritage reflects a larger shift in interests in an interview with KERA's Lauren Silverman at SXSW Interactive. “I was born and raised here in Texas, I’m Mexican at heart but Tejano by birth so that experience is my own bicultural experience ... you won’t see me watching novelas, but you will see me watching the 'Daily Show',” Rayo says.

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