Krys Boyd | KERA News

Krys Boyd

WFAA

Television news anchors wear a lot of hats: they inform us, they entertain us, and sometimes they even comfort us. John McCaa has served all of those roles as an anchor at WFAA-TV. Today on "Think" and during a public forum tonight, he talked to Krys Boyd about being a calming and level-headed presence when the news might cause some to panic.

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In 1987, Michael Morton was sentenced to life in prison for murdering his wife – a crime he didn’t commit. He served 25 years before having his conviction overturned. Monday on Think, he told Krys Boyd that for many of those years, his life was ruled by resentment and thoughts of revenge.

Copyright © 2014, Jeffrey Gusky All Rights Reserved.

The August issue of National Geographic features photographs of art made by soldiers in the trenches of World War I. The images were captured by Jeff Gusky, who’s also an emergency room physician in North Texas. Today on Think, he told Krys Boyd that his experiences as a photographer and doctor are intimately connected.

Teachers have a huge responsibility as they prepare students for the future. Tonight, you’ll hear how they do that in Teaching the Future, the second installment of a two-episode television series focused on education in North Texas.

The Pledge Patrol: KERA Staffers Share Their Stories

Feb 4, 2013

With KERA-90.1 FM's winter pledge drive winding down (don't forget to donate here!), it's the perfect time to look back at the personal stories that our radio personalities have shared over the last few days.

We had to start somewhere, so we asked all of 'em where they started: How they got in to broadcasting, and specifically public radio.

Two-and-a-half million Americans are considered the "working poor" -- that's the highest that number's been in at least the last two decades, says Pulitzer Prize winner David Shipler, who joins Krys Boyd on Think today at 1 p.m. Shipler wrote the book The Working Poor: Invisible In America. The public radio show Marketplace recently took an intriguing look at day-to-day life for these people. A couple of the choicest cuts: Kids often are charged with chipping in, and families sometimes even split up just to make ends meet.