juvenile justice system | KERA News

juvenile justice system

From Texas Standard:

Texas is one of six states that tries 17-year-olds as adults. But a new bill wants Texas to follow the national trend of raising the age of criminal responsibility from 17 to 18.

House Bill 122, authored by Reps. Harold Dutton Jr. (D-Houston) and Gene Wu (D-Houston), passed the House last week and could be on its way to the Senate.


Jeff Heimsath / Texas Tribune

A new report examines the high cost of court fines and fees and how they can trap minority kids in a downward spiral. Alex Piquero with the University of Texas at Dallas co-authored the study and he joins KERA’s Justin Martin to talk about its findings.

To Help Rehabilitate Juveniles, Texas Keeping Them Closer To Home

Oct 2, 2016
Jennifer Whitney / The Texas Tribune

More than a year after state lawmakers told it to stop incarcerating so many teenagers, the Texas Juvenile Justice Department has diverted 52 juvenile offenders to local programs for help and rehabilitation instead of shipping them to state lockups.

albund / Shutterstock.com

New research from the University of Texas at Austin found girls in the juvenile justice system tend to serve longer sentences than boys.  

Dane Walters / KERA News

Café Momentum has been hosting once-a-month pop-up dinners in various locations for three years, but it will finally have a permanent home.

Dane Walters / KERA News

Meet Leonardo Alvarez, who spent much of his youth, as he puts it, “dealing dope.” That landed him in Dallas’ Youth Village juvenile detention center. He’s been through the Café Momentum program, which teaches young men how to work in restaurants.

In this video Leonardo talks about his girlfriend’s pregnancy, his legal stumbles and his struggle to stay on the straight and narrow.

Dane Walters / KERA News

Café Momentum has some of the hardest tables to book in Dallas. The once-a-month pop-up dinners sell out fast at $100 a plate. They’re held at hot restaurants around the city. They feature gourmet menus, top-notch table service and high-profile chefs who work side-by-side with eight kids who provide an unexpected twist: All eight are incarcerated at a Dallas County juvenile detention center.

A Houston jury has convicted Texas financier R. Allen Stanford on all but one of the charges he faced for allegedly bilking investors out of more than $7 billion in one of the largest Ponzi schemes in U.S. history.

A new program at the Dallas County Juvenile Department is offering a second chance to some teenagers who find themselves in juvenile court facing charges and possible jail time. KERA’s BJ Austin says the Department recently celebrated the first graduating class of its new “Mental Health Court”.