John Dietz | KERA News

John Dietz

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

School districts throughout the state are applauding a court ruling that may eventually lead to an overhaul of the way Texas pays for schools.

On Thursday State District Judge John Dietz again declared the state’s school funding system unconstitutional.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

A judge who declared the Texas school funding system unconstitutional will hear more evidence Tuesday before entering his final, written ruling. 

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Texas schools will begin this year with more state money than last year, but most are getting less than they did in 2011, before state lawmakers dramatically cut the education budget.

Funding still varies dramatically from district to district, which is one of the reasons a state judge in February found Texas’ school finance system unconstitutional for the second time in a decade.

As part of KERA’s American Graduate Initiative KERA took a look at the funding gap and how it’s affecting kids in a district that is often at the end of the receiving line.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

School districts and their lawyers hope a state judge’s ruling will force Texas to spend more money on public education.

Sara Robberson / Special to KERA

District Judge John Dietz has ruled the Texas school finance system, which serves over 5 million public schoolchildren, is unconstitutional. 

“The court declares the school finance system  is not adequately funded and therefore fails to make suitable provision for the support and maintenance of the system,” Dietz said Monday, explaining one of the reasons he ruled against the state. 

KERA News

An Austin judge is expected to announce Monday whether Texas’ school finance system is constitutional or must be overhauled.  It’s a decision that could lead to greater funding of public schools.