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Jobs

The U.S. economy created an estimated 209,000 jobs in July, representing a modest slowdown from the previous month but coming in better than many economists had expected. The unemployment rate ticked down to 4.3 percent from 4.4 percent.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics said in its monthly report that, statistically, July showed little change from previous months, as the number of unemployed persons remained around 7 million.

Ask Texas State Demographer Lloyd Potter what caught his attention in a recent release of census data for Texas cities, and he’ll tell you: Houston, in Harris County.

“In the past three or four years, prior to the [2015-16] set of estimates, Harris County was the most significant growing county in the country numerically,” he says.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

To help address youth unemployment in North Texas,  several companies recently gathered at the first-ever Dallas Opportunity Fair, a day-long hiring event to help local 16- to 24-year-olds find jobs.

Christopher Connelly/KERA

For most of us, the word “auction” conjures up images of antiques or fine art or even foreclosed houses. Ritchie Bros. in Lake Worth offers a very different kind of auction – one on the scale of massive earth-moving equipment.

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KERA's series, One Crisis Away, looks at life for people on the financial edge. In this edition, why some people feel they can’t get away from the edge even as the economy is recovering.

Sam Baker talked with Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal about the survey the show did to find out.

Christopher Connelly/KERA

These days, oil prices seem to go nowhere but down. In Texas, drivers are paying less than $2 per gallon at the pump, on average. So what do low gas prices mean for consumers, and for this oil-producing state’s economy?

Texas Jobs Numbers: The Good, The Bad, The Meh

Sep 18, 2015
Matthew Rutledge via flickr

The Texas unemployment rate has dropped to 4.1 percent, the lowest rate since 2001. That’s the good news for Texas in the August jobs report. The bad news: The state lost jobs, especially high-paying oil jobs. Still, economists say there are some bright spots.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

The mayors of Dallas, Fort Worth and three other North Texas cities got together on Thursday with a single purpose – to tackle what’s known as the “skills gap.” A booming economy is producing jobs, but the mayors say too few people are coming out of school with the skills to do those jobs.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

As the congressman for a district with unemployment that's higher than the state average, and income that's lower, Rep. Marc Veasey has made jobs his top priority.  Not just creating jobs, but raising salaries for the people who live in Congressional District 33 which stretches from West Fort Worth to West Dallas.

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If you’re looking for work in Dallas-Fort Worth, your best bet is to look in the health care industry.

Lauren Silverman

The job hunt is complicated enough for most high school and college graduates. But for the growing number of young people on the autism spectrum, it is a daunting challenge. Nationwide 90 percent of adults with autism are either unemployed or underemployed. Despite the obstacles these people face trying to find work, there's a natural landing place: the tech industry.

Amelia Schabel graduated from high school five years ago. She had good grades and enrolled in community college. But it was too stressful. After less than a month she was back at home, doing nothing.

Texas Instruments

Dallas-based Texas Instruments has begun sending layoff dates to 1,700 employees , 500 of them in North Texas.

TI, which isn't closing any plants, announced the cuts to its worldwide staff two weeks, ago saying they are part of a strategic shift to refocus its wireless business.

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A study released by the U.S. Conference of Mayors predicts double-digit job growth over the next five years.

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North Texas topped all other US metro areas in job creation the last two years.  But economic development expert Richard Florida says DFW’s success will depend on what the area does to keep workers.

Daniel Fogg

The leading lights of the global energy industry are gathered downtown for the annual CERA Week conference. IHS CERA used the occasion to roll out a study on the broader economic effects of growth in the energy sector.

Texans for and against the Keystone XL pipeline say President Obama’s rejection of the pipeline today will affect the Lone Star state. KERA’s Shelley Kofler reports.

The manufacturer of the B-2 bomber and unmanned aircraft used by the U.S. military says about 210 people working at the company's facility in Fort Hood will be laid off in February.

Herndon, Va.-based Northrop Grumman Technical Services, Inc. says in a letter to the Texas Workforce Commission the employees will lose their jobs around Feb. 29. The company was required under the Worker Adjustment Retraining and Notification (WARN) Act to inform the commission of the layoffs.

The fight over the Frisco lead smelter got hotter last night. Frisco’s Planning and Zoning Commission unanimously rejected a plan that would have favored Exide, the city’s long-standing smelter and recycler. Exide opponents call it a victory. KERA’s Bill Zeeble reports plant workers now fear the business might close or move, taking their jobs.

Dallas, TX – Texas added more than 15,000 jobs in September but unemployment is still higher than a year ago. KERA's Shelley Kofler has more on why.

In the past year more than 188,000 additional workers have joined the Texas labor force. So while there's been a gain in new jobs, there's also been an increase in the number looking but unable to land a position. That's resulted in the unemployment rate rising from 8 percent to 8.5 percent.