immigrants | KERA News

immigrants

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Those 2,000 immigrant children will not be coming to temporary shelters in Dallas County after all, the county's top elected official announced Thursday afternoon.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Since last October, more than 57,000 kids from Central America have crossed the U.S.-Mexico border. Many of these immigrant children are living in North Texas. Brayan Arce is one of them. He's from Honduras, but he says that living there has become too dangerous, especially for kids. Brayan, who's 14, shares his story of how he came to join his mom in Dallas. He hadn't seen her in 11 years.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

So far, most of the debate over the immigrant children who have crossed the Texas border has been political. On Monday, an event featuring religious and community leaders supporting those children put a spotlight on a girl in the middle of that debate. She told her story with the help of a translator.

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Republican Sen. John Cornyn believes that by August Congress will take up a bipartisan immigration bill he is sponsoring with Rep. Henry Cuellar, a Democrat from Laredo.

The bill aims to speed the removal of thousands of migrant children from Central America who have crossed into the United States and are being detained at the border. 

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

When 2000 children from Central America come to North Texas later this month, they’ll be greeted by a burgeoning army of volunteers. Here's how local organizations are responding to folks who want to help.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

The Dallas County Commissioners Court had a packed house Tuesday. Many in the audience were there to hear the latest on plans to temporarily house 2,000 children who’ve been detained at the border.

The Obama administration announced Monday that most of the immigrant children who’ve crossed the border will be sent back to their home countries, and it plans to ask Congress for $3.7 billion in emergency funds. KERA sat down with a local immigration attorney to see how the kids make their way through the legal system.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Dallas County Commissioners will meet Tuesday morning as controversy builds over County Judge Clay Jenkins' recent announcement that the county would help the federal government set up centers for 2,000 immigrant children. The lone Republican county commissioner, Mike Cantrell, doesn’t think Jenkins’ idea is a good one.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins on Thursday identified  three North Texas sites that will potentially shelter the 2,000 immigrant children from Central America that are currently in McAllen.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Dallas County plans to soon welcome 2,000 of the 52,000 children who’ve entered the country illegally in recent months. They’re coming from Central America and crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. Many are trying to escape violence and drug cartels.

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Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins is headed to the Rio Grande Valley Wednesday to visit a detention center where hundreds of children from Central America have been living. On Tuesday, Jenkins met with charity groups and emergency managers to talk about how to bring 2,000 or more of the immigrant kids to North Texas later this month. KERA's Doualy Xaykaothao is in McAllen, and she found out how residents see the situation. 

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins’ announcement Saturday to temporarily house as many as 2,000 children who've entered the country illegally surprised many people. Now, some local groups are preparing to meet with Jenkins to find out how they'll be helping.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

Community meetings could begin by the end of the week to discuss the thousands of immigrant children who will soon be cared for in Dallas County.

On Saturday, at the Democratic state convention, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins announced plans to open facilities that will house at least 2,000 of the 52,000 children who’ve entered the country illegally in recent months.

Calling the situation a "humanitarian crisis," County Judge Clay Jenkins said Dallas County is prepared to house more than 1,000 immigrant children.

"I believe that every child is precious, and that regardless of your stance on immigration or the causes for this human tragedy, we cannot turn our back on the children that are already here," Jenkins said while speaking at the Texas Democratic Convention on Saturday.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

The number of children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border has skyrocketed in recent months. So much so that officials in town for the U.S. Conference of Mayors made it a topic of discussion on Sunday.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Imagine seeing your parent shot to death in what may have been a misunderstanding because of race. That’s the story of one woman who has helped organized a conversation about race and education. It took place Thursday night in Dallas at the Bishop Arts Theatre Arts Center.

Update at 10 a.m. ET. Game Has Been Cancelled:

Our friends at NPR member station KUT report the Young Conservatives of Texas has called off a game of "catch an illegal immigrant," which had sparked condemnation from the University of Texas at Austin community at large.

Monica Ortiz Uribe/Fronteras Desk

While apprehensions of immigrants crossing the Mexican border are near record lows, South Texas is the one spot where the numbers are rising again, according to a recent report from Fronteras Desk, a public radio initiative involving several stations across the Southwest.

"We could apprehend anywhere between 100 and 200 a shift," said Mark Foster, a Border Patrol supervisor. "On the weekend, it’s very hard to get all the incursions dealt with, with the manpower that we have."

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Dallas claims more English language learners than any school district in Texas. Despite that, state funding cuts forced the district to close its "intake center" for immigrant families two years ago. But just in time for the new school year, which starts Monday, the center has reopened.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

In the West Dallas branch of the city’s public library system, students are learning English. That's no surprise -- especially for a neighborhood with many Latino immigrants.

What's different here, though, is that both parents and kids are in class -- right across the hallway. The dual effort is part of the new Atmos Energy Literacy Center, which opened in January as a partnership with Texas A&M University Commerce. 


American Freedom Through An Immigrant's Eyes

Jul 3, 2013

As a lawyer for Human Rights Initiative of North Texas, William Holston has represented immigrants to this country since 1999. He explains in this commentary how immigrants have helped him see our country’s freedoms with fresh perspective.

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