immigrants | KERA News

immigrants

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

From the temporarily delayed Senate Bill 4, which cracks down on "sanctuary cities," to the decision to wind down a program that gives work permits to young people living in the country illegally, undocumented families in Texas are on edge.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

The White House will announce its decision about DACA, an Obama-era immigration policy, on Tuesday, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. President Trump had earlier said the announcement could come at some point over the weekend.

As a presidential candidate, Trump pledged to "immediately terminate" DACA, the program that former President Barack Obama began five years ago to protect immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

But once in the White House, Trump took a softer stance.

From Texas Standard:

In the first months of his administration, President Donald Trump has made good on a campaign promise: to tighten immigration restrictions and crack down on immigrants living in the United States illegally. The Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, or ICE, has rounded up immigrants in raids across the country, creating a boom for private prisons — an industry that's a growing part of the Texas economy.

A federal grand jury has indicted James Matthew Bradley, Jr., on five counts related to the discovery of dozens of immigrants who were crammed into a semi's trailer in a Walmart parking lot during hot weather in San Antonio last month.

Brandon Martinez, 16, was one of nearly 40 undocumented immigrants found on a blistering summer day inside an unventilated trailer parked at a San Antonio Wal-Mart. Ten died, and Brandon barely survived.

Federal officials who interviewed some of the survivors say that the human cargo was assembled and loaded into the truck in the border city of Laredo.

Some had paid smugglers to take them across the Rio Grande in rafts. One immigrant said there were as many as 200 people in the back of the truck.

From Texas Standard:

The first few days of the school year are an anxious time for most kids. But there’s a group whose levels of stress and anxiety are so high that they can only be compared to those who have experienced trauma.

Silvia Zuvieta Rodriguez is one of them.

“Since I was little I always had anxiety when it came to my parents not coming home at a certain time,” she says.

When transcripts of President Trump’s conversations with foreign leaders about refugee policy leaked to the press last week, one line got a lot of attention. It was a reference to “local milk people,” presumably dairy farmers, whom the president thought refugees wouldn’t work for.

As it turns out, though, some “milk people” worry it's Trump's immigration policies that may be bad for business.

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

In Dallas’ refugee-rich Vickery Meadow neighborhood, there’s a group of artists that’s determined to change the conversation around women and race. These artists are young, but age doesn’t stand in their way.

The deaths of 10 migrants in a sweltering 18-wheeler in San Antonio has raised a lot of questions. One of them: Why transport people in the back of a tractor-trailer, especially after they have already crossed the border?

One reason, experts say, is that entering the United States from Mexico illegally involves "two crossings." You must first cross the U.S./Mexico border, then one of the many Border Patrol checkpoints that exist farther into the United States.

Fifteen immigrant rights activists were arrested Wednesday after blocking traffic at the intersection of 15th Street and Congress Avenue during a sit-in to protest Attorney General Ken Paxton's push to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA.

Lexey Swall / The Texas Tribune

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton and officials from nine other states on Thursday urged the Trump administration to end an Obama-era program that’s allowed hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants to live and work in the country without fear of being deported.

The U.S. Supreme Court says it will re-hear a case that asks whether immigrants detained by the government have a right to a bond hearing to challenge their indefinite detention.

The case was argued in November 2016, months before Justice Neil Gorsuch filled the vacant seat of late Justice Antonin Scalia.

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Immigration is often described in broad generalizations.  But commentator William Holston thinks if we focus on individual immigrants, the discussion can look very different.

May Day protests and rallies around the world and across the U.S. are celebrating labor, calling for greater protections and benefits for workers and highlighting the contributions of immigrants.

For the first time in more than a decade, Mexicans no longer make up the majority of immigrants staying in the U.S. illegally, according to new estimates by the Pew Research Center.

Researchers at Stanford University this week published a study that may bolster the argument that policies aimed at encouraging immigrants to come out of the shadows actually improve public safety. They found that a 2013 California law granting driver's licenses to immigrants in the country illegally reduced hit-and-run accidents by 7 to 10 percent in 2015, meaning roughly 4,000 fewer hit-and-runs. In that same year, 600,000 people got driver's licenses under the law.

In cities around America, thousands of construction companies, restaurants and other businesses are bracing for "A Day Without Immigrants," a combination boycott/strike that highlights the contributions of immigrants to U.S. business and culture.

Hundreds were detained at airports around the country Saturday in a chaotic and confusing day following President Trump's Friday night executive order temporarily banning Muslims from seven countries.

It spurred protests and backlash — even from some in Trump's own party, for either mismanagement of the rollout of the order or the values it represents.

Bangladesh. Myanmar. Benin. Somalia. Haiti. Ireland. South Sudan. Iraq.

One by one, 59 immigrants from 29 countries rise before a federal judge in a Kansas City, Mo., courtroom and proudly state their country of origin.

Some have brought their young children, who watch from the audience. All look eager and intent. This is a big moment: They are about to become U.S. citizens.

In 2017, hundreds of thousands of immigrants are expected to be naturalized as U.S. citizens in ceremonies around the country, much like this one.

A Young Immigrant's Experience In America

Oct 13, 2016
Shutterstock

Isaias Ramos came to the U.S. with his parents when he was 8 years old, got good grades and then had to decide what to do after high school. On Think, Krys Boyd talked with journalist Daniel Connolly about his experience

We Asked Immigrants: What Does It Mean To Be An American

Oct 12, 2016
Jeremiah Jensen/KERA News

This week, as a part of NPR’s “A Nation Engaged” project, member stations across the country are talking about what it means to be an American.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA

David Kapuku came to the U.S. with his family in 2013 after his mother won the Diversity Visa Lottery. KERA reporter Stella Chávez met David while reporting on immigrant students in North Texas for a series called “Generation One.” She recently caught up with David, who’s just graduated from high school. He talks about how the past few weeks have been filed with triumph and tragedy.

lcars / Flickr

Dallas County is facing scrutiny because of how immigrants are detained in jail. More than a dozen people have sued Sheriff Lupe Valdez and the county for how their cases were handled.

UWashingtonPress

Chinese immigrants who arrived at San Francisco's Angel Island were regarded as criminals, unlike Europeans who docked at Ellis Island on the opposite coast. Erika Lee talked to Think host Krys Boyd about how the first immigration laws in the U.S. targeted the Chinese -- especially laborers -- and The Making of Asian America

Eric Lewis / flickr.com

Some immigrants have what’s known as the matricula consular, a form of identification issued in their native country. The state, however, doesn’t accept the card. Neither does Dallas County, and that has immigrant advocates worried about how the policy will affect children who need a birth certificate to enroll in school.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Tuesdays are when KERA’s American Graduate project charts the journey from childhood to graduation. Today, we chart a different sort of journey – the one Dinesh Mali made from childhood in India to his spot as the first Indian-American elected to the Irving school board.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Texas legislators are debating whether to repeal the Texas Dream Act. Signed by then-Governor Rick Perry in 2001, the law allows certain undocumented students to pay in-state tuition. A recent Texas Tribune analysis revealed that the majority of undocumented students who pay in-state tuition rates don't attend four-year universities – they’re in community colleges. And most are in school here in North Texas.

Dallas Conference Focuses On Crimes Against Women

Mar 18, 2015
https://www.facebook.com/NationalCCAW

Crime is down in North Texas, but Dallas police chief David Brown says the exception is crimes against women. 

Family photo

The killing last week of Ahmed Al-Jumaili, a Muslim man who'd just arrived from Iraq, has focused international attention on the northeast Dallas neighborhood where he was staying. He was outside with his wife and brother, taking photos during the snowstorm, when he was shot. No one's been arrested, and that's left his neighbors uneasy.

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