Hurricane Katrina | KERA News

Hurricane Katrina

Red Cross of North Texas / Flickr

In 2005, Keith Rhodes was running the Methodist Home for Children in New Orleans. Then, Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Louisiana Gulf Coast. He had to evacuate dozens of kids, and move his own family to safety.

Children's Health System

There are a number of differences between the shelters housing Harvey evacuees and the ones where victims of Katrina went 12 years ago. A big one is telemedicine. Children, especially, are being treated by doctors in remote locations.

 

Cathy Frisinger/UT Southwestern Medical Center

About 700 people spent the night Thursday at the shelter at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center.

Caring for evacuees after a natural disaster presents a huge medical challenge, which Dr. Ray Fowler of UT Southwestern Medical Center knows well.   

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Houstonian Lorrine Adamore is holed up in one of the three shelters Dallas set up for people fleeing Hurricane Harvey.

It’s a familiar feeling: 12 years ago she was rescued by boat when her New Orleans home was swamped by Hurricane Katrina.

Brad/Flickr

In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Texas cities like Houston and Dallas became a place of refuge for thousands of evacuees.

Many were fleeing deplorable conditions at the Louisiana Superdome, which was set up as a temporary shelter. Former Dallas Mayor Laura Miller says it was a scramble to organize relief efforts.  

KERA news

The storm and the disaster that followed reshaped New Orleans and had a dramatic impact to North Texas, and beyond.

About 26,000 evacuees made their way to Red Cross shelters near Dallas. The influx of people shocked the city.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

After Hurricane Katrina battered New Orleans, many flocked to North Texas. Meet Kenny and Annette, a couple born and raised in the Greater New Orleans area, just two blocks from the Lower Ninth Ward.  The hurricane played a role in splitting up their previous marriages. In North Texas, Kenny and Annette found each other. 

Katrina Evacuees: There's Still No Place Like Home

Aug 29, 2013

Eight years ago this month, Hurricane Katrina nearly destroyed New Orleans. Commentator Rosalyn Story recently returned with friends to find a city vibrant, and full of energy. But she says some who settled in North Texas have no desire to live in New Orleans again.