Hurricane Katrina | KERA News

Hurricane Katrina

Children's Health System

There are a number of differences between the shelters housing Harvey evacuees and the ones where victims of Katrina went 12 years ago. A big one is telemedicine. Children, especially, are being treated by doctors in remote locations.

 

Cathy Frisinger/UT Southwestern Medical Center

About 700 people spent the night Thursday at the shelter at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center.

Caring for evacuees after a natural disaster presents a huge medical challenge, which Dr. Ray Fowler of UT Southwestern Medical Center knows well.   

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Houstonian Lorrine Adamore is holed up in one of the three shelters Dallas set up for people fleeing Hurricane Harvey.

It’s a familiar feeling: 12 years ago she was rescued by boat when her New Orleans home was swamped by Hurricane Katrina.

Brad/Flickr

In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Texas cities like Houston and Dallas became a place of refuge for thousands of evacuees.

Many were fleeing deplorable conditions at the Louisiana Superdome, which was set up as a temporary shelter. Former Dallas Mayor Laura Miller says it was a scramble to organize relief efforts.  

KERA news

The storm and the disaster that followed reshaped New Orleans and had a dramatic impact to North Texas, and beyond.

About 26,000 evacuees made their way to Red Cross shelters near Dallas. The influx of people shocked the city.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

After Hurricane Katrina battered New Orleans, many flocked to North Texas. Meet Kenny and Annette, a couple born and raised in the Greater New Orleans area, just two blocks from the Lower Ninth Ward.  The hurricane played a role in splitting up their previous marriages. In North Texas, Kenny and Annette found each other. 

Katrina Evacuees: There's Still No Place Like Home

Aug 29, 2013

Eight years ago this month, Hurricane Katrina nearly destroyed New Orleans. Commentator Rosalyn Story recently returned with friends to find a city vibrant, and full of energy. But she says some who settled in North Texas have no desire to live in New Orleans again.