homelessness | KERA News

homelessness

Courtney Collins / KERA News

A big city library has turned around the way it handles some of its most marginalized visitors. The Dallas Public Library has committed to not just tolerating—but welcoming—every homeless person who walks through the door.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

The Dallas Commission on Homelessness recently published a 51-page report recommending strategies to tackle the city's significant homeless issue. 

Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

In Dallas, homelessness has been in the headlines in recent months. The homeless population is going up and the city has been struggling with solutions. KERA’s Stephanie Kuo has been following this issue for many months, and she talked with Eric Aasen.

As Dallas Struggles With Poverty, Landlord Plans Abrupt Closures

Oct 6, 2016
Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

Dallas City Hall is scrambling to keep hundreds of families from becoming homeless as a real estate management company threatens an abrupt, mass eviction in some of the city’s poorest neighborhoods.

It’s going to be easier for some populations to vote this year because of recent court-ordered changes to the voter ID law.  One group is the state’s homeless population, which typically faces many hurdles casting a ballot.

STEPHANIE KUO / KERA News

Some of Dallas’ neediest homeless people will soon have a place of their own: a tiny house.

The Cottages at Hickory Crossing opened recently just south of Deep Ellum -- and residents are moving in over the next few weeks. Many say these small cottages are a step in the right direction in the city’s ongoing struggle with homelessness.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

We met Denzel Bailey, a UT-Arlington student, a year ago. He's a homeless student in college. He spent the summer with his grandparents in south Fort Worth. Bailey is entering his senior year – and trying to balance work and school, while hoping to find a place he can call home.

From Texas Standard:

When Sam Espinosa was a kid, it took a while for Austin Independent School District to learn he was homeless.

"My mom is a fairly private person – she was never one to let anyone else into,  you know, what we were going through," Espinosa says.

So, Sam and his five siblings became fairly good at pretending they had a place to live.

 


STEPHANIE KUO/KERA

A commission presented a report to the Dallas City Council yesterday with possible solutions on ending homelessness in the city. Some council members were disappointed and divided about what to do. 

Cottages at Hickory Crossing

Fifty tiny houses -- dubbed the Cottages at Hickory Crossing -- will soon be home to 50 of the most expensive homeless people in Dallas.

STEPHANIE KUO

The homeless have plenty to worry about, and their health often takes a backseat to more pressing concerns like housing and food. Doctors say that ultimately takes a toll.

Cooper Neill/The Texas Tribune

For the more than 200 homeless people that until recently lived under a highway overpass in Dallas’ "Tent City," the nylon roofs over their heads were a relatively safe haven from the streets, the closest they could come to a permanent home.

STEPHANIE KUO

The city of Dallas has shut down Tent City, the homeless camp under Interstate 45 near downtown and Deep Ellum. Over the past few weeks, officials have helped hundreds of people move out. Caseworkers are helping homeless people prepare for life away from the highway underpass, but many of them face an uncertain future.

STEPHANIE KUO

Dallas officials have shut down Tent City, the homeless encampment under I-45 near downtown. The nearly 300 tents are gone, the trash and debris have been cleared, and the city has fenced off the area. It's a bit quieter now than it was months ago.

In North Texas, we’re all about convenience. The drive-through Starbucks, burger joint, even drive-through bank. Still, there aren’t any drive-through health clinics. But there are clinics on wheels — they’re run by Parkland Health & Hospital System. The clinics have been crisscrossing Dallas for more than a decade, serving the people in the community who need it most.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

If you grow up in a stable home, with supportive parents, it can be hard to see all the paths that lead to homelessness. But they’re there — like trap doors in a dark house.

STEPHANIE KUO

The deadline to close Tent City in Dallas is May 4. As hundreds of homeless men and women leave life from under the interstate, the difficult task will be to keep them off the streets. Advocates and researchers say the city's response to finding them permanent housing is largely inadequate.

Stephanie Kuo/KERA News

With homelessness surging in North Texas, and Dallas debating a plan to shut down a makeshift Tent City, CEO Larry James of the nonprofit CitySquare says he remains "quietly optimistic." 

As Tent City Shuts Down, Concerns In Dallas About How To Address Homelessness

Apr 6, 2016
Stephanie Kuo / KERA News

Dallas city officials say they’re on track with plans to shut down a homeless encampment known as Tent City. But it may take longer than expected. 

Maureen Barlin / Flickr

The homeless population in Dallas and Collin counties is up 24 percent from last year. That’s according to officials at Tuesday’s annual State of the Homeless address.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

KERA shined a spotlight on homeless students and the adults helping them last spring in the American Graduate series "Homeless in High School." Much of the action took place at North Dallas High, which has one of the highest homeless student populations in North Texas.

A new after-school drop-in center for those kids has just opened -- in a church across the street.

Christopher Connelly/KERA

2015 was a good year for Matthew Newman. The Dallas entrepreneur decided to give back today by hosting a catered lunch for the residents of Tent City, a sprawling homeless encampment under the I-45 freeway in downtown Dallas.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

When homeless high school kids get to college, what happens to them during the holidays? Texas Woman’s University in Denton is a leader in helping those with no home for the holidays.

From Texas Standard:

According to the latest statistics, about 12 of every 10,000 Texans are living homeless, many of whom have an intellectual or developmental disability. While state programs and aid are available, the wait times are daunting. Some services have lists with applicants waiting for well over a decade.

Some reports rank Texas near last place with regard to well-being of those with intellectual disabilities.  John Savage has been following the story for the Texas Observer.

 


born1945 / Flickr

Sometimes small expenses can completely derail folks trying to leave homelessness behind.

For people just getting into transitional housing, little costs like a work uniform or a car tire can be enough to put them back on the street or in a shelter. That's where "flex funds" come in.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Denzel Bailey was homeless in high school -- and since he graduated, he’s lived in a dorm at the University of Texas at Arlington. Except summer, when the dorm closes. Summertime can be a tough time for homeless college kids like Denzel. 

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Two North Texas nonprofits are teaming up to make the dream of home ownership a reality for a local veteran.

For this 55-year-old and his young daughter, a new house is the high point in a decade that’s been marked with despair.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Veterans face many challenges when looking for work after leaving the military.

Dallas is one of the cities the Department of Veterans Affairs has chosen for a new program engineered to improve veteran hiring. North Texas companies are already on the job.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

National data shows up to 40 percent of homeless teens who knock on shelter doors are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning their identity. As a result, one Fort Worth shelter has recently transformed itself from a place gay and lesbian kids had shunned.

Lara Solt / For KERA News

North Dallas High School has the most homeless students in the Dallas Independent School District -- one out of eight are without a home. Many see North Dallas High as a center of innovation, thanks to its homeless outreach efforts.

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