historic preservation | KERA News

historic preservation

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Five stories that have North Texas talking: Austin and Dallas are looking for a new police chief and city manager at the same time; “Mexican American Heritage” isn’t the first inaccurate textbook written for Texas classrooms; tonight's State of the Arts will trace Fort Worth’s musical history; and more.

Cody Neathery/Plano Magazine

After years of back-and-forth, the Plano City Council has decided to put the fate of one of the city’s oldest houses in the hands of the voters. In May, the future of the 155-year-old Collinwood House will be sealed in a $3.5 million bond election. 

Cody Neathery/Plano Magazine

For several years, the city of Plano has been trying to figure out what to do with the 155-year-old Collinwood House. The City Council could decide the future of the West Plano house as early as April. Preservationists are hoping that a look into its past could save it. 

Save Pemberton's Big Spring-Trinity Forest / Facebook

Five stories that have North Texas talking: today’s the last chance to register to vote in the primary; Texas has six cases of Zika virus; DMA’s Jackson Pollock gets national TV time; and more.

From Texas Standard:

Laredo is one of the fastest growing cities in the country. Between 2007 and 2012 the city grew by more than 13 percent. Downtown merchants, like Maria Velazquez, have been noticing the change.

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Update: Fans of Lakewood Theater descended on a dumpster outside the iconic movie house Thursday to rescue antique seats, trashed to give crews more room to get rid of asbestos inside. Now, the head of the Dallas Landmark Commission says the site will be considered for historic landmark designation.

Great Plains Restoration Council

Update, Tuesday 4:47 PM: Jarid Manos says that his group, the Great Plains Restoration Council, would likely try to work with the prospective buyer on preserving even a portion of Rock Creek Ranch.

“If we do this right and there’s conservation, it makes [the buyer’s] project not just another [building], but sustainability for the landscape," Manos says. "There are very accomplished landscape architects. We can still use it in a way. [Rock Creek Ranch] is too priceless to lose. It expresses life like people don’t imagine, right in our own backyard."