Hillary Clinton | KERA News

Hillary Clinton

The second debate between presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton promised a great deal and managed to deliver on much of it. But those expecting either to see Trump knocked out of the race or to see him dramatically reverse the current campaign momentum went away disappointed.

It could be said this meeting had the highest stakes ever for any single debate, even as it set new lows for the level of personal attacks.

PBS Newshour / YouTube

With less than one month until the election, Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the second presidential debate Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

Ahead of the second presidential debate Sunday night, the secret Donald Trump audiotape of him bragging about groping and kissing women — and let's be clear, if he did what he's bragging that he did, it would be assault — has shaken the presidential race and is reshaping the presidential map.

Yes, the majority of Trump's supporters are likely to stay with him, but any chance he had at winning over those persuadable voters might very well be gone.

It's hard to be any more gobsmacked about the state of the presidential race right now, after a video of Donald Trump making vulgar comments about women surfaced Friday, prompting more than 30 prominent Republicans to call for him to step aside as the nominee.

Excerpts from speeches Hillary Clinton was paid to give to big banks suggest a relationship with Wall Street that is a lot more familiar and pragmatic than the fiery rhetoric she has sometimes used on the campaign trail.

"I represented all of you for eight years. I had great relations and worked so close together after 9/11 to rebuild downtown, and a lot of respect for the work you do and the people who do it," she told a Goldman Sachs symposium on Oct. 24, 2013.

The controversial whistleblower organization WikiLeaks on Friday released emails that they say are linked to Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta.

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Kim Adams

At Tower Grove Christian Academy in St. Louis, Missouri, Donna Kohlberg said she is disgusted with the election, namely the behavior of both candidates, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

Still, the teacher, assistant principal and volleyball coach plans to watch the presidential debate — which takes place Sunday in St. Louis — in hopes of  hearing more about issues like Trump University, Clinton’s actions in Benghazi, and the candidates' plans for how they would change the economy.

PBS Newshour / YouTube

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head Monday night in the first presidential debate, which is anticipated to be one of the most-watched political events ever.

The first presidential debate tonight is shaping up to be one of the most-watched political events ever, with a potentially Super Bowl-size audience.

Here are four things to watch for as Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump take the stage at Hofstra University on Long Island.

1. Which Trump shows up

Donald Trump "won" the primary debates by dominating his opponents, often by name-calling and bluster. This one will be different.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will be together on stage for the first time on Monday. Both candidates have a lot at stake when they meet at Hofstra University in New York for the first of three presidential debates, this one with moderator Lester Holt of NBC News.

Each has different opportunities and challenges in the debates. Here are four things Clinton will have to think about. We also looked at four things to watch for Trump.

GEORGE BUSH PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

Adding to potentially the most awkward Thanksgiving ever, George H.W. Bush is reportedly voting for Hillary Clinton this November.

Hillary Clinton's begrudging release of information related to her health on Sunday follows a pattern set by candidates and many who have won the Oval Office.

It is a pattern of secrecy and, in some cases, cover-ups that would be scandalous if they occurred on other issues of policy.

Bryan Snyder/Aaron P Bernstein / Reuters

The Dallas Morning News made its name reporting the news, but this week, the paper made news. The editorial board endorsed Hillary Clinton – the first time it’s endorsed a Democrat for president in the general election since World War II.

KERA News

The Dallas Morning News endorsed Hillary Clinton for president today. It's the first time the newspaper's editorial board has recommended a Democrat for president in a general election since World War II.

Poll: Donald Trump Leads Hillary Clinton By Only 6 Points In Texas

Aug 16, 2016
Michael Stravato / Shelby Tauber / Texas Tribune

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is leading Democratic rival Hillary Clinton by just 6 percentage points in deep-red Texas, according to a new poll

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / Texas Standard

Tim Kaine, the Democratic nominee for vice president, is in Texas this week – and he responded to the latest controversial comments from Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

Tim Kaine No Stranger To Texas Democrats And Donors

Aug 9, 2016
United States Department of State/United States Senate

Nearly six years ago, then-Democratic National Committee Chairman Tim Kaine was headed to Las Cruces, New Mexico — a battleground state in the 2010 midterms commanding national attention.

CNN

Donald Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, sketched out his plans on the economy in Detroit on Monday. KERA radio aired the speech live, followed by a call-in special hosted by Think's Krys Boyd.

Mike Blake / Reuters

Dallas billionaire Mark Cuban returned to his birthplace of Pittsburgh on Saturday to endorse Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, borrowing a local term to assail her bombastic Republican rival. 

The Path For Clinton

Jul 28, 2016
Shutterstock

Hillary Clinton will accept the nomination for president tonight at the Democratic National Convention. Today on Think, Krys Boyd hosted a two-hour special on Hillary Clinton and the DNC. The episode featured a report from NPR’s Sam Sanders, a look at Clinton's background and a panel of political scientists discussing the convention so far. 

PBS Newshour

Today is the last day of the Democratic National Convention -- Hillary Clinton will accept her party's nomination for president, becoming the first woman nominated by a major U.S. political party. You can watch the convention livestream here all day, and the NPR/PBS NewsHour coverage starting at 7 p.m. Central time.

From Texas Standard:

Hillary Clinton gives her big speech tonight accepting the Democratic nomination at the party's convention tonight in Philadelphia.

Perhaps you caught the speech from her husband, talking about Hillary's time in south Texas.

"She met one of the nicest fellas I've ever met, the wonderful union leader Franklin Garcia," Bill Clinton said in his speech Tuesday. "He helped her register Mexican-American voters. I think some of them are still around to vote for her in 2016."

If the name Franklin Garcia sounds familiar, there's a reason for that.

 


Donald Trump urged Russian agents to "find" his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton's emails and release them, an unprecedented move by a candidate for president encouraging such a foreign breach.

"Russia, if you're listening, I hope you're able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing," the GOP presidential nominee said at a news conference in Miami on Wednesday. "I think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press."

The Democratic National Convention made history Tuesday evening: Amid applause, shouts, cheers and in some cases tears, the delegates on the floor of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia nominated Hillary Clinton for president of the United States.

Clinton is now the first female presidential candidate of a major American party.

PBS NewsHour

Delegates will vote for their nominee and Bill Clinton will speak on Day 2 of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. You can watch the convention livestream here all day, and the NPR/PBS NewsHour coverage starting at 7 p.m. Central Time.

Minnesota Public Radio

The first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia kicks off with speeches by First Lady Michelle Obama, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and the party's presidential runner-up, Sen. Bernie Sanders. You can watch the convention livestream here all day, and the NPR/PBS NewsHour coverage starting at 7 p.m. Central Time.

5 Things To Know About Tim Kaine

Jul 23, 2016

After weeks of speculation, Hillary Clinton's campaign has announced she will tap Tim Kaine as her running mate.

Appearing on stage together for the first time since Friday's vice presidential announcement, Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine made a push for voters of color by highlighting his record on diversity and civil rights.

Kaine also spoke about gun violence, job creation, equal pay and raising equal pay — all mainstays of Clinton's campaign.

Clinton said Kaine has "lived" the values of diversity. That, she argued, is in contrast the GOP ticket and last week's Republican National Convention. "Tim Kaine is everything Donald Trump and Mike Pence are not," she said.

Tim Kaine is boring. Just ask him.

"I am boring," the man Hillary Clinton picked on Friday night to be her running mate said last month on NBC's "Meet The Press."

The Virginia senator tried to play it off with something of a dad joke: "But boring is the fastest-growing demographic in this country," he laughed.

So why would Clinton pick "boring" to be her vice president? (And it's not because there are suddenly loads of more boring people out there voting as a bloc.)

Hillary Clinton has chosen Tim Kaine to be her vice presidential running mate. The Virginia senator has been an elected official — including mayor, governor and senator — for over 20 years and was once the chairman of the Democratic National Committee. He was also on President Obama's shortlist of running mates in 2008.

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