higher education | KERA News

higher education

How much money will you earn with a degree from the University of Texas system? How much debt after graduation will you rack up? UT System officials have unveiled a new website they say is the first of its kind to give salary and debt information of its students one to five years after graduation.

A growing trend at America’s colleges: Humanities majors are on the decline. Commentator Lee Cullum explains why that's cause for concern.

Paul Quinn College

Paul Quinn College, the historically black school in southern Dallas, has named the winner of its Miss PQC pageant.

She’s a Latina.

That’s a first for the college and its 86-year-old pageant.

Students from low-income families often don’t apply to the best schools in the country. Ivy League universities like Harvard have noticed and are trying to figure out how best to connect with those students.

Yesterday’s show Here & Now featured a story from Houston’s public radio station KUHF that looks at how one program there is tackling this issue head-on.

Kent Hance, the Texas Tech chancellor, is retiring, several media outlets are reporting. He's served in the position since 2006. Hance earlier served in the Texas Senate, Congress and Texas Railroad Commission. Hance "weathered a lengthy media firestorm and ensuing legal battle following the termination of popular Texas Tech head football coach Mike Leach in 2009," the Texas Tribune reports.

Almost a third of college students will transfer schools at least once within five years, and many opt to go to Texas. The U.S. News and World reports that Texas, Arizona, and California schools are the most popular places for new transfer students. Out of Texas schools, the University of North Texas, Texas State University and the University of Houston had the highest transfer acceptance rates.

BdwayDiva1 / Flickr

A record number of Hispanic high school graduates enrolled in college last fall outpacing their white counterparts, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center.

Using U.S. Census data, the study found that seven in 10 Hispanic students, or 69 percent, who graduated in 2012 went on to college compared to 67 percent of white students.

Janine Khammash / KERA News

At public universities in Texas, only 1 in 4 full-time freshman graduates within four years. That's obviously a problem for students -- and with Texas legislators considering a bill that would increasingly link state funding to graduation rates, it's a pressure point for colleges, too.

University of Texas

Texas public college and university enrollment rose by 22.5 percent between 2007 and 2012, but state funding fell.

Lee Green / (cc) flickr.com

The state’s largest business organization is pushing legislation that will link higher education funding to the number of college students who actually get a diploma.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Governor Rick Perry is putting new pressure on universities to contain tuition and graduate more students.

Governor Perry will be in Dallas Monday to promote his plan for making college more affordable. But some universities think his plan is a one way street.

The Texas Association of Business wants the state to withhold some money for community colleges until graduate rates rise. The group has even put up billboards to encourage support. KERA's Bill Zeeble reports the Dallas County Community College District says the business group doesn't know the whole story.

A new billboard on Central Expressway reads "8 PERCENT OF DALLAS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENTS GRADUATE IN 3 YEARS. IS THAT FAIR TO THE STUDENTS? It's signed by the Texas Association of Business.

Dallas, TX – A newly-launched pilot education program could help more North Texans attend college. KERA's Bill Zeeble reports TexCan - the Texas College Access Network - will target first generation and low-income students.

Dallas, TX –

What was expected to be a routine vote on a state proposition to extend a low-interest student loan program may have run into a political buzz-saw called the Texas Tea Party. Texas Public Radio's David Martin Davies has more.

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