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higher education

Austin Price / The Texas Tribune

For about a year starting in June 2016, the practice of affirmative action in Texas university admissions seemed secure. 

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Texas' top public university administrators remain among the highest paid in the country, according to a nationwide survey released Wednesday.

The Texas Tribune

While small numbers of Texas voters believe spending on public and higher education is too high, pluralities think the state is not spending enough, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT News

The legislative session just ended. After 140 days of proposals, politicking and press conferences, we’re catching up on what actually passed and how it will change Texas.

Perhaps the biggest disappointment of Texas’s 85th Legislature was the demise of a bill that would have added more than half a billion dollars in funding for the state’s public schools.

Texas Foster Youth Struggle To Get College Degrees

Nov 13, 2016
Allison V. Smith for The Texas Tribune

Shortly before her ninth birthday, Briana Dovi and her five siblings were placed into foster care in Central Texas. Dovi enrolled in school for the first time, battling speech disorders and dyslexia.

SMU Ties UT, Baylor Passes Texas A&M In 2017 U.S. News College Rankings

Sep 13, 2016
Shelby Knowles / The Texas Tribune

The latest version of the U.S. News and World Report college rankings are good news for Texas private schools. Not so for the state's top public universities: All of them dropped in the influential list of the best schools in the country. 

Lawmakers to Examine Ballooning Cost Of Tuition Program For Texas Veterans Tuesday

Sep 12, 2016
The Texas Tribune

State university leaders have long complained about what they call an underfunded mandate to provide an increasing number of veterans and their dependents a free college education under the Hazlewood Act

Dan Patrick Again Targeting In-State Tuition For Undocumented Students

Sep 9, 2016
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / The Texas Tribune

The program affects only about 2 percent of Texas college students, but getting rid of in-state tuition for undocumented immigrants will be a priority for Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick when lawmakers convene next year.

Courtesy of Caylin Moore

Caylin Moore says he shouldn't be in Fort Worth. Considering where he grew up, his future seemed to be predetermined.

“Prison, dead, on the street selling drugs,” he says.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera/The Texas Tribune

In his most aggressive terms yet, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick excoriated Texas universities for raising their tuition in recent years, suggesting that the Texas Senate will try to limit tuition growth when it reconvenes next year. 

Sara Ortega / Uplift Education

Many people were shocked to hear in February that kids from a Dallas charter school endured racial insults during their trip to Texas A&M in College Station. More dramatic stories came out during a symposium on Friday sponsored by the Uplift charter school chain.

When Andrea Diaz was applying to colleges, she got good news and bad news. The good news was that American University, a private four-year university in Washington, D.C., wanted her. The bad news was that it required her to come to campus early to take two summer developmental-level courses in math and English.

"I was traumatized by it," Diaz says, "because I felt that they didn't see in me the potential to do well in college."

Texas Behind In Preparing Kids For College, Panel Told

Mar 30, 2016
Shelby Knowles / Texas Tribune

Texas lags most other states in preparing high schoolers for college and needs to update its readiness standards, including oversight of dual credit courses, Higher Education Coordinating Board Commissioner Raymund Paredes told state senators at a hearing on Tuesday.

With Federal Funding Elusive, Texas Professors Crowdfund Research

Nov 30, 2015
Shelby Knowles / Texas Tribune

When Mikhail Matz visits the world's coral reefs, he's consistently awed by "perhaps the most spectacular manifestation of life's beauty, complexity and just sheer profusion that can be witnessed on this planet," he said. 

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Two elementary schools in Richardson ISD have debuted new lessons this fall that spotlight everything from landing a good job to planning for college. And a free savings account is part of the deal.

New College Rankings Put Some Dark Horses At The Top

May 1, 2015
Jorge Salcedo / Shutterstock.com

A new college ranking from the Brookings Institution has some surprising results—Rice and St. Mary’s in Texas are way above Northeastern elites like Dartmouth and Wellesley. The ranking is based on how much of an income boost you should get from college, versus what you actually get.  

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Texas legislators are debating whether to repeal the Texas Dream Act. Signed by then-Governor Rick Perry in 2001, the law allows certain undocumented students to pay in-state tuition. A recent Texas Tribune analysis revealed that the majority of undocumented students who pay in-state tuition rates don't attend four-year universities – they’re in community colleges. And most are in school here in North Texas.

Simon Cunningham / flickr.com

Dallas County high school seniors missed out on $34 million in college grants last year. That’s according to Commit, a local nonprofit that says more than half of the students did not apply for financial aid. We find out what they and others are doing to change that.

Dianna Douglas

Students at Paul Quinn College are about to be put to work. The historically black college in South Dallas is being reborn as a “work college,” where everyone who lives on campus works for the school in some form or another.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Downtown Dallas doesn’t have a full-fledged university – it has three of them, all based at the Universities Center at Dallas. The biggest by far is a branch of Texas A&M Commerce.

Courtesy UT Arlington

The chancellor for the University of Texas System, William McRaven, says Texans should be charged in-state tuition at Texas colleges, regardless of their immigration papers. That’s the law right now, although it’s become a hot debate among legislators who want it repealed. 

Dianna Douglas / KERA News

Black and Latino students in Dallas high schools pass the Advanced Placement exams at the highest rate in the country. The story of how Dallas became the national leader in getting underrepresented minorities to pass these classes is a bright spot for the urban school district. 

Laura O. Graham, Courtesy SMU

Sophomores at Southern Methodist University have a new rule this year: they’re required to live on campus along with the freshmen. To make room for all these students, the university has built five new dorms and is renovating more.

Dianna Douglas

Going off to college seems like the American dream for first-generation, low-income students. But not if they drop out with loads of debt a few years later. 

Courtesy of Southern Methodist University, Kim Leeson

SMU and the University of Texas at Dallas have opened new dining halls this fall. These state-of-the-art kitchens offer vegan, gluten-free, and sophisticated foods to students. 

 

Now serving thousands of meals a day to young foodies, the new Arnold Dining Commons at Southern Methodist University is a leap forward from the college dorm cafeterias of yesterday. 

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

This week Republican Greg Abbott and Democrat Wendy Davis visited university campuses as they touted their plans for improving higher education.

But their styles couldn’t have been more different.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Attorney General Greg Abbott brought his campaign for governor to Dallas Tuesday to draw attention to his plan for higher education. But the hottest buzz surrounded debate jockeying between Abbott and his Democratic opponent, Wendy Davis.

Bob Booth / Fort Worth Star-Telegram

In Fort Worth Thursday, State Sen. Leticia Van De Putte, the Democrat running for lieutenant governor, rolled out her plan to provide a free, two-year college education to all qualified high school graduates.

Study Up For 'Think': The Cost Of College

Jun 25, 2014
fleshmanpix / Flickr

College tuition has  has risen by 1,120 percent over the past few decades. As a result, the relationship between colleges and students has changed drastically. Filmmaker Andrew Rossi joins Think today at noon to discuss his latest documentary Ivory Tower.

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