health care | KERA News

health care

A new report puts Texas among the worst in the U.S. for state health care services and delivery. State officials say officials say they’re working on improvements.

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Teachers and parents say they don't know why Texas' public schools have the lowest percentage of special education students of any state in the country.

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The Supreme Court’s decision on the healthcare law threw many lawmakers in Washington for a loop. Now the Texas congressional delegation is examining how to proceed.

Janine Khammash / KERA

The day after the Supreme Court’s decision upholding the federal healthcare law, people are trying to figure out how it will affect them.

Texans are wading through a flood of opinions on Thursday’s Supreme Court ruling upholding the healthcare law – and how that law may affect them. 

A state commission has approved a 50 percent increase in the wholesale electricity price cap in a move it hopes will spur construction of more power plants.

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The US Supreme Court will rule this week on the Affordable Care Act, the federal health care overhaul. There are four issues opponents think could sink the law.

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The U.S. Supreme Court will decide the future of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act this week.  It might not be that affordable for some.

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The Supreme Court will rule this month on the federal health care law – as early as this week. BJ Austin talked with health care policy expert Anne Dunkelberg and Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott.

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Faced with a medical problem, many people opt for the emergency room or they contact their primary physician. But in today’s Health Checkup, we look at when to use a third option: urgent care centers. Sam Baker talked with Dr. Sarah Holder, medical director of the Quick Care Clinic at Methodist Charlton Medical Center in Dallas. 

The decision by the U.S. Supreme Court on health care reform could affect all Texans, including the nearly six million without health insurance. Local health care experts say the required coverage for everyone could make people healthier, but clog waiting rooms. And it could ultimately change the way health care is paid-for and delivered.

State Attorney General Gregg Abbott will have a seat in the US Supreme Court again today as Texas and 25 other states continue their three-day challenge of the federal healthcare law.

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Texas is in a stand-off with the federal government over a program that provides contraception and reproductive check-ups for low-income Texas women. A new Texas rule would exclude Planned Parenthood clinics from participating.

State officials in Austin told lawmakers that the percentage of Texans with health insurance would rise from 74 percent to 91 percent under new federal health care rules.

State Medicaid Director Billy Millwee also said the state is prepared for new laws, whether the U.S. Supreme Court declares them constitutional or not.

Lawmakers were meeting Monday to hear how the federal healthcare program will affect the state.

The Republican-controlled Legislature has complained about the cost of implementing the new health care law.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins says he has three priorities for 2012: no tax increase; pay raises for county employees; and more money for veterans programs. KERA’s BJ Austin reports.

Dallas, TX – In today's KERA Checkup we want to remind you of a statewide service that will help you find low-cost health providers. KERA's Shelley Kofler says the first step is picking up your phone.

Dial 2-1-1 anywhere in Texas and you'll be connected with a trained specialist who knows about the low-cost medical services in your community.

Dallas, TX – Priority one for state lawmakers meeting in Austin next week is to plug a $25 billion budget shortfall. Just how big is that? Well, if you shut down all the prisons, laid off every state trooper, eliminated every service except public education, higher education and health care, you still wouldn't cut $25 billion.

Governor Rick Perry and others have suggested Texas drop out of Medicaid, the federal-state health program for low income children, elderly and the disabled. It's Texas's fastest growing expense.

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