health care | KERA News

health care

Shutterstock

Health insurance companies aren’t the only ones competing for your money as the Affordable Care Act’s insurance mandate deadline approaches. Scammers are also trying to get in on the confusion. According to Jim Quiggle, a national spokesman for the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud. There are a variety of tricks con artists use to get sensitive information – most often they’ll pose as representatives of government agencies.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services released data for the first time comparing average hospital charges for the 100 most common Medicare claims. A Washington Post analysis of the 10 most common medical procedures showed hospitals in Texas routinely had higher prices than the rest of the country.

Some North Texas health care companies are starting to practice what they preach. Baylor Health Care - known for its exceptional cancer treatment programs – now screens job seekers for nicotine use. If applicants applying online respond that they are smokers, they are re-directed to resources to help them stop smoking before they can reapply. As Susan Ladika reports for Workforce, Baylor joins the 4 percent of companies that follow a policy to not hire nicotine users. In Texas, 18.5% of the adult population are current cigarette smokers. Across all states, the prevalence of cigarette smoking among adults ranges from 9.3% to 26.5%. In Texas, 17.4% of high school students smoke.

Governor Rick Perry says he won't sign legislation that expands access to Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. But news that Gov. Mike Beebe of Arkansas is looking into a third option to provide health care with federal assistance is making people wonder if Perry might follow his lead.

By 2030, nearly six million Latinos will be obese, according to The Texas State Demographer’s office. KUT's Veronica Zaragovia reports local communities are trying to raise awareness and shrink waistlines.

As far back as he can remember, George McCann lived in fear. When he was asleep he would have horrific nightmares filled with violent images. When he was awake, he often felt threatened by people, including members of his own family. And when he felt threatened, he would become aggressive, even violent.

George spent his childhood certain that something very bad was going to happen. And when he was 12, it did. His unrelenting fears led to a violent outburst at school. And George landed in a psychiatric hospital.

Hospitals across the country are turning to the neighborhood pharmacy to keep patients well after they return home from the hospital. The federal government began penalizing hospitals with high readmission rates in October, and although Texas hospitals are doing slightly better than the nation overall at preventing readmissions, some are looking to partner with pharmacies such as Walgreens to provide support for patients and follow-up care after hospital stays. Scott & White Healthcare, based in central Texas, recently announced its partnership with Walgreens.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Governor Rick Perry is adamant, Texas will not make Medicaid available to more Texans by taking part in a federal program. But recently other Republican governors in Nevada and Arizona have changed their minds, saying they can’t ignore the billions of federal dollars they’d lose by opting out.

Lawmakers in Austin are now debating what Texas should do, including a senator from  Greenville who also wears a stethoscope.  

Erica Feliciano

The state of Texas is restoring some cuts it made to low-income, elderly patients on Medicare and Medicaid.

The population explosion in North Texas’ has brought a growing number of children without health insurance, and some of the counties affected come as a surprise.

Tim Baker / flickr

More than 1200 uninsured people have scheduled appointments for Saturday’s Dallas CARE Clinic. Organizers hope that first visit is just the beginning for those without coverage.

Among ‘Best Cities,’ We’re No. … 41

Sep 27, 2012
Keith Allison / (cc) flickr

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Dallas 41st in 50 best cities list, healthy food gets trashed in schools, and more.

VideoFest

Five stories that have North Texas talking: a jumbo TV screen, a huge hitmaker and the biggest free clinic in Dallas.

BJ Austin / KERA News

Several hundred low-income, uninsured Texans want Governor Perry to change his mind and expand Medicaid, as called-for in the federal healthcare law. They’ve traveled to Austin today from Dallas, Houston and San Antonio to deliver petitions to the Governor.

Credit: jmtimages (cc) flickr

In 2014, companies with more than 50 workers must provide health insurance or pay penalties under the Affordable Care Act.  The new healthcare law offers help to some small businesses, but leaves others worried about the bottom line.  

jimtimimages / flickr

Governor Rick Perry is turning down a state health insurance exchange and expansion of Medicaid. Those are two key provisions in the federal health care overhaul.

Neil R (cc) flickr

The state of Texas and the Justice Department are beginning their arguments in a trial over Texas' new voter ID law, setting the stage for a legal battle over the federal Voting Rights Act.

Lawyers for Texas are arguing a 2011 law passed by its GOP-dominated Legislature that requires voters to show photo identification does not violate the Act, passed in 1965 to protect minorities' right to vote. The Justice Department - along with other intervening groups supporting the Justice Department's position - says the law disproportionately discriminates against minority voters.

A new report puts Texas among the worst in the U.S. for state health care services and delivery. State officials say officials say they’re working on improvements.

Seth Sawyers / Flickr Creative Commons

Teachers and parents say they don't know why Texas' public schools have the lowest percentage of special education students of any state in the country.

jimtimimages / flickr

The Supreme Court’s decision on the healthcare law threw many lawmakers in Washington for a loop. Now the Texas congressional delegation is examining how to proceed.

Janine Khammash / KERA

The day after the Supreme Court’s decision upholding the federal healthcare law, people are trying to figure out how it will affect them.

Texans are wading through a flood of opinions on Thursday’s Supreme Court ruling upholding the healthcare law – and how that law may affect them. 

A state commission has approved a 50 percent increase in the wholesale electricity price cap in a move it hopes will spur construction of more power plants.

<a href="http://www.shutterstock.com">shutterstock.com</a>

The US Supreme Court will rule this week on the Affordable Care Act, the federal health care overhaul. There are four issues opponents think could sink the law.

<a href="http://www.shutterstock.com">shutterstock.com</a>

The U.S. Supreme Court will decide the future of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act this week.  It might not be that affordable for some.

jimtimimages / flickr

The Supreme Court will rule this month on the federal health care law – as early as this week. BJ Austin talked with health care policy expert Anne Dunkelberg and Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott.

bobbyyb78 / Flickr

Faced with a medical problem, many people opt for the emergency room or they contact their primary physician. But in today’s Health Checkup, we look at when to use a third option: urgent care centers. Sam Baker talked with Dr. Sarah Holder, medical director of the Quick Care Clinic at Methodist Charlton Medical Center in Dallas. 

The decision by the U.S. Supreme Court on health care reform could affect all Texans, including the nearly six million without health insurance. Local health care experts say the required coverage for everyone could make people healthier, but clog waiting rooms. And it could ultimately change the way health care is paid-for and delivered.

State Attorney General Gregg Abbott will have a seat in the US Supreme Court again today as Texas and 25 other states continue their three-day challenge of the federal healthcare law.

Pages