Greg Abbott | KERA News

Greg Abbott

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

The campaign of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis has released letters from her two adult daughters who say they want to correct “untrue things” and “ludicrous comments” about their mother.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

James O’Keefe is at it again. The controversial conservative activist has focused his hidden camera on Battleground Texas – the Democratic operation trying to turn Texas blue.

His Project Veritas operation released a video this week showing a Battleground Texas worker laughing and talking about Greg Abbott, the Republican candidate for governor, being in a wheelchair.

Fort Worth Democrat Wendy Davis announced Tuesday she raised $12.2 million in the last half of 2013 for her governor's campaign. Republican Greg Abbott reported raising $11.5 million in the same time period but says he has a total of $27 million on hand to wage his campaign. Political analysts say each candidate will need close to $40 million to be competitive if they become their parties' nominees as expected. Davis, who entered the race in October, currently has about half as much money her her campaign account as Abbott. But she's demonstrated an ability to keep pace with his fundraising in the past six months.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis outlined a plan Thursday for attracting more top students to teaching and for improving the pay of those already in the classroom.

Texas Republicans can't get hold of enough guns.

Greg Abbott, the party's front-runner for governor, posed for a recent cover of Texas Monthly with a rifle over his shoulder. Nearly every other GOP statewide candidate has put out pictures or videos proudly displaying firearms.

Tea party activists have been gunning for Sen. John Cornyn. But even they were surprised when Steve Stockman, a Republican Congressman from the Houston suburb of Friendswood, filed on the last possible day to run against Cornyn in the March Republican primary. 

Former Texas Republican Party Chair Tom Pauken is ending his campaign for governor saying he can no longer ask supporters and conservatives for help when there is "no realistic path to victory."

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Attorney General Greg Abbott, the leading Republican candidate for governor, was in Plano Tuesday to focus on schools.  It was the first of his statewide visits before finalizing his education policy. His likely Democratic opponent, Wendy Davis, wasn’t there, but she was still part of the discussion.

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Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott says criticism surrounding the state's first election under a new voter ID mandate is "overhyped" and being driven by partisans.
 
Abbott told The Associated Press on Monday that requiring some voters to sign affidavits was proven to be "no big deal" during early voting.

Attorney General Greg Abbott, the leading candidate for the Republican nomination for Texas governor, holds a single-digit lead over the likely Democratic nominee, state Sen. Wendy Davis of Fort Worth, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

In a head-to-head race, Abbott got 40 percent of registered voters to Davis’ 34 percent, with 25 percent of the voters undecided. In a three-way general election, he would get 40 percent, Davis would get 35 percent and Libertarian Kathie Glass would get 5 percent.

“What you’ve got is a race in which, for the first time in a long time, the Democrat is as well-known as the Republican at the outset of the race,” said poll co-director Daron Shaw, a professor of government at the University of Texas at Austin.

A leading Democratic candidate for Wendy Davis’ Senate seat has indicated he will not be running in 2014, leaving the party with a smaller margin of error in the Texas Senate.

Some in the Texas Democratic Party believed Fort Worth City Councilman Joel Burns would be the person to take over in Davis’ district because he has bipartisan support, but this week Burns announced he would not be running in 2014.

State Sen. Wendy Davis isn't the only governor's candidate who needs an affidavit to vote in the Nov. 5 election.

Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott will need one, too, Matt Hirsch, his campaign spokesman, told the San Antonio Express-News.

The newspaper reports that Abbott has a different name on his driver's license than what's on the voter rolls. Davis faced a similar issue on Monday when she voted early in Fort Worth.

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Update, 7:52 p.m. Monday: A federal judge has ruled that new abortion restrictions passed by the Texas Legislature are unconstitutional and should not take effect as planned on Tuesday. Texas officials immediately appealed the ruling, and the case could eventually head to the U.S. Supreme Court.

District Judge Lee Yeakel blocked one part of the restriction, while allowing another provision to stand.

Yeakel ruled that a state provision that requires doctors performing abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of the abortion facility "places a substantial obstacle in the path of a woman seeking an abortion of a nonviable fetus."

PolitiFact.com

On the day that state Sen. Wendy Davis announced her candidacy for governor, Texas Right To Life released an ad claiming that Davis, a Fort Worth Democrat, "opposes any limits on abortion." 

PolitiFact Texas researched the claim and rated it "false."   Here's the analysis.  

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

In Dallas on Monday, Attorney General Greg Abbott defended a new state abortion law being challenged in federal court this week.

Attorney General Greg Abbott, a GOP candidate for governor, is tweeting his approval of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to hear Texas' arguments against EPA rules for regulating greenhouse gases.

Texas Tribune

Media coverage of the race for governor has focused on a likely battle between Democrat Wendy Davis and Republican Greg Abbott.  But another Republican, Former State GOP Party Chair Tom Pauken, says Abbott’s reluctance to answer questions gives him an opportunity to be heard. 

KERA’s Shelley Kofler talked with Pauken, 59, about his primary opponent, education and his uphill campaign.

Dane Walters / KERA News

Today, on her first full day as a candidate for governor, State Senator Wendy Davis, will make her case to business leaders at the Fort Worth Rotary Club. Advisers say it’s important for the Democratic contender to combat the “liberal” label opponents want to pin on her.

Jerod Foster / Texas Tribune

Here’s the 411 on the likely general-election matchup for governor in 2014. In one corner: Wendy Davis, the Democratic state senator who announced her bid Thursday in the Fort Worth suburb of Haltom City. In the other: Greg Abbott, the Texas attorney general who’s the front-runner for the Republican nomination, if he can get past former state GOP chairman Tom Pauken.

Dane Walters / KERA News

Update, 5:26 p.m.: In front of hundreds of boisterous supporters, Wendy Davis, the state senator and Fort Worth Democrat, announced that she’s running for Texas governor.

"All of you deserve to have your voices heard because our future is brightest when it’s lit by everyone’s star," Davis said. "And that’s why today I am proud to announce my candidacy to be the 48th governor of this great state."

Davis spoke for about 15 minutes at the Wiley G. Thomas Coliseum in Haltom City, where she received her high school diploma more than 30 years ago.

Texas Tribune

A new statewide poll released Wednesday shows Republican Greg Abbott with an eight-point lead over Democrat Wendy Davis in the Texas governor’s race.

The poll, conducted by the Texas Lyceum, shows Abbott, the Texas Attorney General, leading with 29 percent. Davis, the Fort Worth Democrat, has 21 percent.

But most registered voters don’t know who will get their vote – 50 percent are undecided.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott says he now has assurances American Airlines’ merger with U.S. Airways won’t harm the state’s rural airports. So he’s withdrawing the state’s legal challenge.

American Airlines

The state of Texas has dropped its opposition to the American Airlines-U.S. Airways merger.

Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott says he’s reached an agreement that will keep American’s headquarters in North Texas and maintain DFW as a “large hub airport.” American will also maintain daily service to more than 20 airports across Texas, many serving rural parts of the state.

Texas Attorney General's Office

The Texas Attorney General’s office may be dropping or amending its opposition to the merger of American Airlines with U.S. Air.

Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott and American Airlines CEO Tom Horton have scheduled a press conference for 2 p.m. to discuss recent developments. 

Abbott and the State of Texas joined the U.S. Justice Department in challenging the merger. The state says it violates anti-trust laws and would create hardships for rural, Texas communities.

Texas Tribune

They didn’t appear together or talk about each other, but this weekend voters had a chance to take a closer look at the likely nominees for governor. 

Callie Richmond / Texas Tribune

State Senator Wendy Davis says she'll announce her political plans on Oct. 3, a little more than two weeks from now.

Tyler Pratt/KUT News

All of Texas’ biggest cities have passed ordinances that ban discrimination against people based on sexual orientation – except for San Antonio. That changed on Thursday when the San Antonio City Council voted 8 to 3 to adopt its own policy. Hundreds of people testified for several hours on Wednesday and Thursday.

Texas Sen. Wendy Davis has sent a letter to President Obama asking his administration to reconsider opposition to the merger of American Airlines and US Airways. 

Davis, a Democrat, represents parts of Fort Worth which is where American Airlines resides.

Davis tells the president thousands of jobs will be lost in Texas and around the country if the merger does not succeed.  She says she disagrees with U.S. Justice Department claims that a merger between the two airlines will reduce competition and raise consumer prices 

In the war over the right to vote in the U.S., the Justice Department's choice of Texas as the battleground for its first legal action following the Supreme Court's weakening of the Voting Rights Act has a feeling of inevitability.

Texas Attorney General's Office

The U.S. Attorney General took aim at the Lone Star State yesterday, and his Texas counterpart reacted. Eric Holder and Greg Abbott strongly disagree over the Voting Rights Act.

          

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