graduation | KERA News

graduation

From Texas Standard:

Stephanie Garcia is a high school student. She’s also a 24-year-old inmate at the Lockhart Correctional Facility, a minimum-security women’s prison in Central Texas. Outside, her life was hectic, but here, every day is the same.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath was in Dallas this week to talk about how the state’s schools are doing -- and the impact Hurricane Harvey has had on education.

This week, NPR Ed is digging into the story behind high school graduation rates across the country. NPR partnered with 14 public radio stations nationwide, including KUT.

At 88 percent, Texas has one of the highest graduation rates in the country, and the Austin Independent School District’s graduation rate has increased 12 percentage points since 2008, compared to the all-time high rate of 81 percent nationally. 

But what's the story behind those rates? Take a look at NPR Ed's interactive below to dig into the numbers.

Thousands Of High School Students Getting Lost In Texas

Jun 9, 2015

The US high school graduation rate is at an all-time high. But why? NPR Ed partnered with 14 member stations around the country to bring you the stories behind that number. Check out the whole story here. And find out what's happening in your state. And find out what's happening in your state.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

Over the next few days, thousands of young Texans will receive their diplomas. Some of those students squeaked by thanks to a new state law. High schoolers no longer have to pass all five end-of-course exams to graduate. 

Dianna Douglas

Thousands of students in North Texas are just one or two tests away from graduating high school. This year’s seniors are the first to have to pass five STAAR tests. So many haven’t passed, that Gov. Greg Abbott just signed a law giving those students a loophole.

Dianna Douglas

Recent pep rallies at elementary schools across Dallas have included a little gift for every kid in attendance -- a T-shirt with the name of their local high school and the year they’ll graduate.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

In the Arlington school district, 20 percent of graduating seniors and as many as 27 percent of Hispanic graduates in the Arlington school district don’t apply to college. That startling number is why the district has been partnering with local universities to ensure more students move beyond high school. The latest effort is with the University of North Texas.

Christina Ulsh

Almost 90 percent of high school students in Texas graduate from high school, although there is large variation by race, ethnicity, family income, disability, and English proficiency. At Polytechnic High School in Fort Worth, 74 percent of African-American students graduate, while 80 percent of the Latino students do.

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The Dallas school district is the second largest district in the state – but it boasts the highest graduation rate for big city schools in the state.

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Nine out of 10 college freshmen from the top quarter of incomes graduate by age 24. But for low-income kids, it’s less than three out of 10. Writer Paul Tough spent six months at the University of Texas at Austin exploring why for his New York Times Magazine article, “The Graduation Gap.”

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

State lawmakers reviewing new graduation requirements that go into effect in the fall say they’re confusing and districts may not be prepared to implement them.

Allen school district officials say the high school graduation ceremony scheduled for early June is moving to the American Airlines Center in Dallas.

  The Allen Independent School District is getting a new superintendent. The school board this week selected Lance Hindt, who runs the state's only municipal school district in Stafford, located south of Houston.

andhong09 / Flickr

The State Board of Education approved new high school graduation requirements last month. Among the changes – students don’t need Algebra II or a fourth year of social studies to graduate. Here’s how one district – Richardson – is pushing its students beyond the state requirements.

The State Board of Education approved new high school graduation requirements last month. Among the changes – students don’t need Algebra II or a fourth year of social studies to graduate.

 

Here’s how one district – Richardson – is pushing its students beyond the state requirements.

 

Most Eighth Graders Fail to Get Degree 11 Years Later

Feb 11, 2014
The Texas Tribune

Among young Texans who started eighth grade in 2001, less than one-fifth went on to earn a higher education credential within six years of their high school graduation. And rates were even lower among African-American and Hispanic students and those who were economically disadvantaged.

Now that Texas lawmakers have revamped high school graduation requirements, the State Board of Education must decide what courses should be considered advanced. KUHF Public Radio in Houston looks at this issue, which the board takes up this week. A final decision is expected in January.

Texas Graduation rates continue to go up and have a reached a new record high, Commissioner of Education Michael Williams said Tuesday.

A study released by the Texas Education Agency shows the Class of 2012 had a graduation rate of 87.7 percent up from 85.9 percent in 2011. The graduation rate has steadily increased since the class of 2007 when 78 percent of students graduated.

The Dallas Independent School District graduated a record number of students this year, according to numbers released by the district Wednesday.

DISD reports that 7,302 students received diplomas in June - the highest number in 31 years. That's 345 more students than graduated in 2012 and more than 1,600 graduates since 2007.

More than 240 Dallas students who had quit school got their diplomas over the weekend.  In a continuation of KERA’s American Graduate project, Shelley Kofler looks at how they beat the odds.

BdwayDiva1 / Flickr

A record number of Hispanic high school graduates enrolled in college last fall outpacing their white counterparts, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center.

Using U.S. Census data, the study found that seven in 10 Hispanic students, or 69 percent, who graduated in 2012 went on to college compared to 67 percent of white students.

Janine Khammash / KERA News

At public universities in Texas, only 1 in 4 full-time freshman graduates within four years. That's obviously a problem for students -- and with Texas legislators considering a bill that would increasingly link state funding to graduation rates, it's a pressure point for colleges, too.

Lee Green / (cc) flickr.com

The state’s largest business organization is pushing legislation that will link higher education funding to the number of college students who actually get a diploma.

Joe Fruchey / (cc) flickr

Texas high school graduation rates are up compared to a decade ago. But KERA’s Bill Zeeble reports they lag behind the national average, and fall even farther behind a nationwide goal of graduating 9 out of 10 students.