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Google’s latest Doodle pays tribute to the late Tejano superstar Selena Quintanilla-Perez, whose debut album was released Oct. 17, 1989.

The project was pitched by Perla Campos, a Granbury native and the global marketing lead for Google Doodle. She says it was important for her to see Latino culture represented on the front page.

Apple, Facebook, Google and Microsoft are among 97 tech companies that filed court papers supporting a challenge to President Trump's ban on immigration from seven majority-Muslim nations, calling the executive order unlawful, discriminatory and arbitrary and saying that it would hurt their businesses.

Trump's executive order enacting the ban "has had immediate, adverse effects on the employees of American businesses," the companies say, warning that the ban also poses long-term risks.

Elizabeth Myong / KERA News

Google today launched its annual “Year in Search,” a compilation of the most popular news, figures and queries that dominated billions of user searches in 2016.

s_bukley/Shutterstock.com

Five stories that have North Texas talking: what did Texas search for on Google in 2015?; outrage over Ethan Couch; a police chief delivers a baby; and more.

Health Wildcatters

Ten young companies from across the world snagged a spot in the 2015 class of Health Wildcatters. Some entrepreneurs have developed products – one for reducing the risk of stroke, another for easy eye exams – others, health services – like fast access to specialists through telemedicine and bilingual wellness programs for employers. Each company gets $35,000 in seed money and space to work for three months.

The Texas Tribune

After years of experimenting with its groundbreaking autonomous vehicle technology almost exclusively in California, Google confirmed Monday that it has begun testing one of its self-driving vehicles in Austin.

About 1,000 educators will descend on Dallas this weekend to attend the Extra Yard for Teachers summit.  The event is organized by the College Football Playoff Foundation as a way to boost education in advance of Monday night’s championship game. For this week’s Friday Conversation, Google education evangelist Jaime Casap sat down with KERA’s Stella Chavez to talk about his role in the summit and in classrooms.

Frederick A. Murphy / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Five stories that have North Texas talking: remembering Thomas Eric Duncan; Gov. Rick Perry’s highs and lows; the best movies of 2014; and more.

Alcon Labs

Who needs Google glasses when you can have smart contact lenses? Google released its smart lens technology earlier this year, a partnership with pharmaceutical giant Novartis could help bring it to the masses.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Google's Motorola Mobility smartphone unit will shutter its Fort Worth factory by the end of 2014, barely a year after it opened with much fanfare as the first smartphone plant in the U.S.

Shutterstock

On average, every four minutes someone dies of a stroke.

Strokes are also the leading cause of long-term disability in the U.S. But technological and medical advances can help diagnose a stroke early. And early diagnosis and treatment for strokes can mean the difference between life and death.

Smithsonian Channel

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Take a look at Texas from a different vantage point; Dale Hansen’s Michael Sam commentary has been auto-tuned; local museums take part in the Google Art Project; and more.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

Google is selling Motorola Mobility's smartphone business to Lenovo Group for $2.9 billion.

Motorola has produced the Moto X smartphone in Fort Worth -- the first smartphone made in the U.S. Lenovo says it will continue the Fort Worth operation. Lenovo officials tell KERA that "there are now no plans to change Motorola’s approach to manufacturing."

A spokesman for the city of Fort Worth told KERA he wasn’t aware of any changes for the Moto X production. The phones are made at an Alliance plant.

[More from KERA News: Motorola Chooses Fort Worth For New U.S.-Made Phone]

Let's say you're angry with your boss.  You go online and vent in an anonymous post. It's therapeutic, sure. But now your boss wants to sue for defamation.  

In Texas, courts haven't settled on guidelines for online defamation. But a little-discussed case before the Texas Supreme Court could help determine if the state can force companies like Google to identify anonymous bloggers.

Google says Austin will be the next city to receive the search giant's ultra-fast Internet service starting next year. 'Google Fiber' is estimated to be about 100 times faster than basic cable service.