Garland ISD | KERA News

Garland ISD

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

It’s a little after 6:30 at night inside Daugherty Elementary in Garland, but classes are in session. Alvaro Méndez stands in front of a group of eager students: They're parents learning English.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

It’s been a little more than a month since tornadoes wrecked some North Texas neighborhoods. In the Garland Independent School District, officials have been busy helping students and their families get through the recovery process.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Security was tight at Tuesday night's Garland school board work session, including the presence of more police officers than normal, a surveillance tower and a bomb-sniffing dog.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Garland's police chief says the information the FBI sent local law enforcement on one of two gunmen outside a controversial cartoon contest would not have changed his department's response to the event. 

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Sunday night's shooting at Garland’s Curtis Culwell Center surprised many people who live and frequent this Dallas suburban community. Residents in one nearby neighborhood kept each other updated throughout the evening. They say the event is a reminder that incidents like this one can happen anywhere.

On Monday, we learned about how a kid’s knowledge and skills take a hit during the summer break and what Dallas is doing citywide to tackle that problem. Today, we look at how one school district – Garland – is fighting the “summer slide” by arming its kids this summer with more than 50,000 books.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

In Garland, two dozen teachers are still in limbo. Recruited from other countries, they’re on the verge of losing their jobs and being deported when their H1-B visas expire. They're not alone. School systems and teachers across the country – and just down the highway in Dallas – are dealing with similar visa problems.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

More than 600 teachers on H1-B visas were hired to work in the Garland school district during a 10-year period. In that time, the district says the former head of human resources, Victor Leos, pocketed fees and took numerous all-expenses paid recruiting trips to the Philippines.

District officials and a law firm working with the district revealed those findings Tuesday. Some of the teachers who were recruited face deportation when their visas expire in a few months.

Stella M. Chavez / KERA News

Nearly two dozen teachers from other countries in the Garland Independent School District are on the verge of losing their jobs and getting deported. They say they didn’t do anything wrong. Their visas are about to expire and federal officials are investigating.

NPR aired an interesting story this morning about how some parents think their kids begin their school day too early. They and some experts say students aren’t getting enough sleep and wake up feeling groggy. Sleep deprivation can ultimately lead to irritability and health issues like depression. Now, there’s a national petition promoting legislation to prevent public schools from starting before 8 a.m.

DISD

Rene Barajas, who became the Dallas Independent School District’s Chief Financial Officer in January, has resigned to return to his former school district in Garland.

Superintendent Mike Miles made the announcement on Wednesday in a press release saying that Barajas is going to be Garland ISD’s Deputy Superintendent of Business Operations. Before going to DISD, Barajas spent five years as Garland ISD’s chief financial officer.

Bill Zeeble / KERA

The Garland School Board has unanimously picked Dr. Rob Morrison as its lone finalist to be the next GISD superintendent.