Fort Worth ISD | KERA News

Fort Worth ISD

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Over the past few weeks, KERA's American Graduate project has explored why it’s so tough to lead a large urban school district. Both Dallas and Fort Worth are looking for superintendents. This week, we look at how changes in urban districts have made the job even harder.

Fort Worth ISD

Dallas is searching for a new school superintendent. So is Fort Worth. They join districts coast to coast that are also looking for new leaders. Over the next few Tuesdays, KERA will explore why it's so tough for a big-city superintendent to survive, let alone thrive. We kick off the series with a conversation with Patricia Linares, the Fort Worth Independent School District's interim superintendent.

Seth Sawyers / Flickr Creative Commons

The Dallas and Fort Worth school districts are searching for new superintendents. They’re not the only school systems with help-wanted ads. Chicago, Newark and Los Angeles also have openings.

Krystina Martinez / KERA News

Saturday's municipal elections feature bruising mayoral races, tight city council tilts and tough school board tussles.

Theresa Thompson / flickr.com

When Fort Worth voters head to the polls on Saturday, the school board ballot will have a range of familiar faces and newcomers. One of those political newcomers is a principal – in Dallas.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

For a kid with severe physical disabilities, having an aide at school can make a huge difference. It can affect whether a student stays in school or drops out, whether the student passes or fails. As part of KERA’s American Graduate initiative, Stella Chavez catches up with Class of ’17 student Chance Hawkins, a sophomore at Fort Worth’s Dunbar High School.

Santa Fe Public Schools

The Fort Worth school district is once again looking for a new superintendent.

That’s because the district’s top pick no longer wants the job. 

Santa Fe Public Schools

Fort Worth school district trustees made their choice for superintendent over the weekend. During a special morning meeting Saturday, the board voted unanimously in favor of Joel D. Boyd, who’s currently the superintendent of schools in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Block schedule classes run like the multi-hour science labs you might recall from high school or college. Some schools use them. Many don’t. As part of KERA’s American Graduate initiative, here’s a look at the difference a schedule can make.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

U.S. attorney Sarah R. Saldana says two former owners of a tutoring business have pleaded guilty to defrauding several Texas school districts.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

School districts throughout the state are applauding a court ruling that may eventually lead to an overhaul of the way Texas pays for schools.

On Thursday State District Judge John Dietz again declared the state’s school funding system unconstitutional.

Christina Ulsh / KERA News

School started for most North Texas kids on Monday. But not everyone was there on the first day or the second or even the third. Getting every single student to show up is tough. In many districts, students keep trickling in days and even weeks later. A Dallas ISD official explains what keeps some kids away.

Momentous Institute

Here’s a question. Do you know the difference between your amygdala and the hippocampus? There’s a group of 3 year olds in Oak Cliff who do. And soon, pre-K children in Fort Worth may know, too. The district is teaming up with Momentous Institute in a new partnership aimed at teaching young children how to take care of their social and emotional health.

UT San Antonio

Six decades after the U.S. Supreme Court said racially divided schools were unconstitutional, a curious thing has happened. Many school systems are more segregated than ever, but in a completely different way. Tonight, PBS Frontline takes a look at this phenomenon in Baton Rouge, La., in a documentary called Separate and Unequal. What about the numbers in North Texas?

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Summer has just started, but some kids are already thinking about the first day of school this fall. 

At a shopping mall south of Fort Worth, Tarrant County leaders helped to kick-off a registration drive to get poor families from 20 school districts free backpacks loaded with school supplies.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

More details emerged Tuesday about Walter Dansby's forced departure as Fort Worth school superintendent.

Rodger Mallison / Fort Worth Star-Telegram

The Fort Worth school board unanimously named a retired deputy superintendent, Patricia Linares, as its interim leader Monday night. Walter Dansby resigned last week. For the board, experience was key.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Fort Worth Superintendent Walter Dansby negotiated a resignation settlement of more than $900,000. He’ll soon take on a different job.

Max Faulkner / Fort Worth Star-Telegram

In a surprise announcement, Fort Worth ISD superintendent Walter Dansby resigned Monday night. The school board accepted the resignation by a 6-3 vote.  The reasons remain unclear.

Shelley Kofler / KERA News

A new Texas law requires public school students to decide a career track in eighth grade. It’s a sea change with challenges for schools -- and some anxiety for kids.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Kelli Bowdy, one of the students we’re following in our Class of '17 series, is almost through her freshman year at Fort Worth’s O.D. Wyatt High School. She’s even thinking about graduating early. Nationwide, only 3 percent of high school kids manage that.  

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Two minutes. That’s all the time you need to teach your child something new.

That’s the idea behind a series of instructional videos several North Texas school districts are offering parents. This new tool, called ReadyRosie, is getting preschool kids ready for the classroom.

Children at Risk

Spanish and English guides for Dallas and Fort Worth public schools just came out from the non-profit organization Children at Risk.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

With a surge of charter schools and the continued appeal of private schools, the Fort Worth ISD is meeting the competition head on. For the past few years, the school district has been adding academic specialties at nearly every campus. It’s called the Gold Seal Programs of Choice.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

The Fort Worth school district will be able to offer pre-kindergarten to about 3,000 more children because of nearly $490 million in bonds that passed on Tuesday.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

Voters in the Fort Worth Independent School District are being asked to support nearly half a billion dollars in bonds to improve facilities and instruction. Three proposals to do just that are on the Nov. 5 ballot. Offering pre-kindergarten to more children is one of the measures under Proposition 1.

Fort Worth voters could be looking at a bond election in November. This week, Superintendent Walter Dansby presented several possible scenarios for bond programs ranging from $585 million to $777 million. Trustees are expected to vote Aug. 23 on whether to hold a bond election in November.

Seth Sawyers / Flickr Creative Commons

Fort Worth voters could be looking at a bond election in November. This week, Superintendent Walter Dansby presented several possible scenarios for bond packages ranging from $585 million to $777 million.

According to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, the least costly option would include a new high school, more classrooms and security and technology improvements. A different package includes the construction costs of a performing and fine arts campus, new buses and student uniforms. Trustees are scheduled to vote on whether to hold an election on Aug. 23.

The Texas Education Agency accountability ratings out today reveal that most school districts – 92.5 percent — achieved the new “met standard” rating — the state’s temporary pass-fail system that replaced the exemplary-to-unacceptable scale. Both the Dallas and Fort Worth school systems passed.

 

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

  UPDATE The Texas Education Agency accountability ratings reveal most school districts – 92.5% - achieved the new, acceptable rating “Met Standard.” Both Dallas and Fort Worth Independent School Districts “Met Standard.” there’s still a lot of work to be done.

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