finance | KERA News

finance

Courtesy of The Family Place

Domestic violence victims are often women, but not only women. In Texas, one in three men report facing intimate partner violence in their lifetimes.

 

This month the Dallas nonprofit The Family Place opened one of the country’s first shelters exclusively for battered men and their families.

Shutterstock

To live “comfortably” in Dallas these days, you’ll need $57,984 per year, according to a report published this week by Go Banking Rates, a financial website.

U.S. House of Representatives

Congressional Republicans this week rolled out their alternative to the Affordable Care Act. Though some on the right have criticized it as “Obamacare 2.0,” U.S. Rep. Jeb Hensarling says he’s on board with the proposed legislation – with a few tweaks.  

Magnetic Mcc / shutterstock

Some people struggling with money may decide to make big changes to mark the start of 2017.

Experts say there is a right and wrong way to approach financial New Year’s resolutions—and people hoping to succeed need to know the difference. Certified financial planner Hannah Moore gives her best practices.

European Parliament / Flickr

An often overlooked aspect of domestic violence is financial abuse. Victims are forced to co-sign loans, open new credit cards and make purchases they can’t afford.

One Tarrant County woman lost tens of thousands of dollars to her abuser. Years later, she’s still working to regain her financial footing.

Shutterstock

Worrying about money can be stressful, distracting and time-consuming. According to new research, a third of Americans are actually losing sleep over it.

Experts say chronic concern over finances can take quite a physical toll on the person doing the worrying. 

www.gotcredit.com

Your credit score controls the obvious (things like mortgage eligibility) and the not so obvious (like whether you can upgrade your cable package.)

Tony Milburn is on the board for Catholic Charities Fort Worth and works in wealth management for UBS. He talks about the sometimes startling impact of poor credit.

Tim Hamilton / Flickr

KERA’s One Crisis Away project examines life for folks on the financial edge. Many senior citizens fall into that category. They might struggle with getting a job, paying for medicine, or managing wills and power of attorney.

That’s where Dallas County’s Elder Financial Safety Center comes in.

Rick Holter / KERA News

New research out of the North Texas Food Bank's Hunger Center explores the link between food security and other financial habits. According to Research Director Richard Amory, data shows bad financial practices may actually cause food insecurity. 

Courtney Collins / KERA News

YWCA buildings in Dallas used to feature swimming pools and gyms. Those disappeared a decade ago. Since then, the organization has re-focused on women’s health and financial coaching, but until last week, the YW didn’t have a place to call home.

Dianna Douglas

High school seniors are told early and often to fill out a free application for federal student aid— typically called a FAFSA – to help them pay for college. The problem is that filling out the FAFSA requires tax returns, Social Security numbers for parents, and other data that students generally don’t have at their fingertips. 

Simon Cunningham / flickr.com

Dallas County high school seniors missed out on $34 million in college grants last year. That’s according to Commit, a local nonprofit that says more than half of the students did not apply for financial aid. We find out what they and others are doing to change that.

Shutterstock

There are a lot of non-profit organizations in Texas devoted to financial assistance and low income programs designed to give people a leg up. As KERA continues to explore life on the financial edge through our new series One Crisis Away, we’ll compile a list of places where people can go to find help.

Dane Walters / KERA News

When you don’t have a decent savings account or wiggle room in your budget, sometimes all it takes is an expense you haven’t planned for to push you over the financial edge. That’s reality for one in three North Texans, and that’s what just happened to Natalie Berquist.

The single mom living in Lewisville is one of the people we’re following in our series One Crisis Away. Natalie has a steady job, but because of a new monthly bill, she’s giving up her apartment.

boxchain / flickr

It's not just the pursuit of more money that can buy unhappiness. We could be funding our misery with the hard-earned cash we already have. 

Elizabeth Dunn, associate professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, studied how spending habits bear on quality of life for her book "Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending." We revisit her conversation with Krys Boyd at noon on KERA 90.1 FM for our series "Best of Think 2013."

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Texas is a big state, with a big heart. That means a lot of non-profit organizations and well-meaning charities ready to help citizens in need. But sifting through all the options can be overwhelming.

As part of our new series “One Crisis Away,” a look at where to start if you find yourself short on cash or resources. And the first step can be simple as dialing three numbers—2-1-1.