Updated at 7:33 p.m. ET

Aboard a short flight on Air Force One Saturday, President Donald Trump told reporters he could find a new leader to fill the vacancy left by sacked FBI Director James Comey by this Friday, when he leaves on his first foreign trip since taking office.

After comments that the administration intends to move "very quickly" on the process, a reporter in the White House press pool asked the president if that could mean finding a permanent replacement to spearhead the agency by the end of the week. His response: "Even that is possible."

Sen. John Cornyn On Short List To Lead FBI After Comey's Firing

May 12, 2017
Laura Skelding for The Texas Tribune

U.S. Sen. John Cornyn is on the short list to succeed James Comey as FBI director, according to a White House official. 

From Texas Standard:

The firing of FBI Director James Comey is not just a matter of domestic politics. For a look at how it could affect foreign policy, Texas Standard host David Brown turns to Jeremi Suri – the chair for Leadership in Global Affairs at the LBJ School of Public Affairs.

Updated at 1:26 p.m. ET

The absence of former FBI Director James Comey loomed large over the Senate Intelligence Committee's hearing with top U.S. intelligence leaders, but his temporary replacement, acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, assured lawmakers he would not bend to pressure from the White House.

"You cannot stop the men and women of the FBI from doing the right thing, protecting the American people and upholding the Constitution," McCabe said.

From Texas Standard:

May 9, 2017, the day President Trump fired FBI Director James Comey, may go down in history the way Oct. 20, 1973, has. That 1973 date is better known as the “Saturday Night Massacre” – when President Nixon’s attorney general and deputy attorney general resigned. For reaction to Comey's ouster, Texas Standard host David Brown turns to a Texas Democrat and a Texas Republican in Congress.

The White House says President Trump fired James Comey because of how he handled the Hillary Clinton email investigation.

Let that sink in for a moment.

The president, who campaigned before crowds that chanted, "Lock her up," is telling the American people that he summarily fired the FBI director, by letter, because he went outside Department of Justice protocols in speaking out about the Clinton investigation months ago.

Updated at 9:22 p.m. ET

The president has fired FBI Director James Comey, who was overseeing an investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 elections and possible ties to the Trump campaign and top aides.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET.

FBI Director James Comey on Wednesday defended his decision to tell Congress in October that he was revisiting the bureau's investigation into Hillary Clinton's emails.

Testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Comey said he believed revisiting the investigation just before the election — knowing it could affect the outcome — would be really bad, but that not to do so would be catastrophic for the agency's independence. In retrospect, he said, he still believes he made the right choice.

Yuri Gripas / Reuters

FBI Director James Comey and the director of the National Security Agency, Admiral Mike Rogers, are expected to testify before the House Intelligence Committee Monday.

The White House is admitting that it discussed with the FBI media reports that Trump campaign officials were in contact with Russian intelligence agents and that Chief of Staff Reince Priebus asked the FBI to publicly knock down the story.

FBI Director James Comey refused.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The Justice Department's watchdog has launched a sweeping review of conduct by the FBI director and other department officials before the presidential election, following calls from Congress and members of the public.

FBI Director James Comey's letter to Congress reporting a renewed look into emails that could be related to Hilary Clinton's private server rocked the presidential race on Friday.

The Clinton campaign and supporters have jumped on Comey for making such a dramatic announcement so close to an election. The question being raised now is whether the timing and style of the announcement make it illegal.

This week, NPR examines public corruption in South Texas. The FBI has launched a task force to clean up pervasive misconduct by public servants in the Rio Grande Valley. But as NPR's John Burnett and Marisa Penaloza report, the problems are entrenched.

The Rio Grande Valley of Texas is a world apart, isolated by empty ranch land to the north, the Gulf to the east, and Mexico to the south. A million-and-a-half people live there amid dazzling wealth and stark poverty.

FBI / fbi.gov

The FBI has arrested the man they believe is the Mesh Mask Bandit.  59 year old Luis Delagarza was taken into custody at his Farmers Branch home.  

BJ Austin / KERA News

Dallas County District Attorney Craig Watkins is being investigated by the FBI.  The the scrutiny comes after allegations of prosecutorial misconduct in a mortgage fraud case.

Highland Park ISD

Highland Park High School officials say they’re continuing with the school day despite the discovery of another threatening note.

The lawyer for Dallas County Commissioner John Wiley Price calls the government’s forfeiture case against Price “nothing more than a sham or a ruse” to gather more evidence for a criminal investigation.

<a href="http://shutterstock.com">shutterstock.com</a>

The FBI and the North Texas Joint Terrorism Task Force are now in charge of the investigation of a possible bombing attempt in Plano.

A defense lawyer in the corruption investigation of Dallas County Commissioner John Wiley Price says it’s hard to keep quiet. But that’s just what he’s ordering his client to do.

BJ Austin / KERA News

The attorney for Dallas County Commissioner John Wiley Price expects a criminal indictment against his client soon after an FBI document, unsealed yesterday, outlined evidence in the case. The details come nearly a year after a raid on the homes of Price and two others.

Two suspicious envelopes found within minutes of each other this morning kept Dallas and Plano Haz Mat crews busy. The incidents came a day after a large reward was offered in a four-year-old case of white-powder-letters mailed from North Texas.

BJ Austin / KERA

Arlington Mayor Robert Cluck was greeted warmly by fellow mayors at a news conference this morning on regional water conservation. The mayor confirmed he was a target in a murder for hire plot.

The city of Dallas says it will find ways to make boat ramps more visible at Elgin Robertson Park as soon as possible. Early Saturday morning, two women, lost and looking for an I-30 access road, turned onto a boat ramp, drove into Lake Ray Hubbard, and were rescued moments before their car sank.

Lt. Dave Davis is with the Rockwall County Sheriff’s Department.

jypsygen (cc) flickr

Just as the North Texas Tollway Authority tries to shed an image of awarding lucrative sweetheart contracts, an FBI investigation is raising new questions. KERA’s Shelley Kofler has more on actions the board took Wednesday.

In a meeting where NTTA board members talked about the importance of transparency, they emerged from an executive session and quickly agreed to use public money to reimburse board member David Denison’s legal fees. But NTTA Board Chair Kenneth Barr would say little about the reason for the vote or how much money Denison will receive.