farming | KERA News

farming

Shutterstock

Eating a ripe, juicy peach -- from a fruit stand along a country road or from a farmer's market or inside a grocery store -- is a summertime ritual for many Texans. 

While we can get peaches and most produce all year round, the best chance to eat homegrown fruits and vegetables at their peak is knowing their typical season. 

The drought finally broke for Texas ranchers late last year. The range and pasturelands on which cattle graze began to recover. Then came the spring. In Cameron, about 140 miles northwest of Houston, the rain began falling at the start of May — and didn't stop all month.

Michael Ahler, Flickr Creative Commons

While family farms are quickly disappearing in Texas, small-scale agriculture is still alive and well in some immigrant communities in North Texas.

Urban Gardening Could Get Easier In Dallas This Week

Mar 24, 2015
Jeff Whittington / KERA News

For the first time since 2010, the Dallas City Council this week is considering new rules around agriculture within the city limits. The new ordinance was put together by a team of food activists, gardeners, city staff and elected officials. Susie Marshall, executive director of GROW North Texas, was one of those people. 

Courtney Collins / KERA News

Watering hundreds of apple and peach trees, weeding gardens chock full of eggplant and okra, and mowing 11 acres of land is tall order for any farmer.

Just imagine doing all that at age 74.

As the average age of the American farmer is clicking steadily upward; one Tarrant County couple is farming long past retirement age.

Summertime, fresh air, blue skies can bring to mind healthy fresh produce, though you don’t expect it to happen near downtown Dallas! Commentator Joan Davidow shares her new weekly farming experiences and looks at how we could all take steps to a better life right in our own back yard.