Energy Transfer Partners | KERA News

Energy Transfer Partners

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., ruled Wednesday that the Trump administration failed to follow proper environmental procedures when it granted approval to the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project.

It's a legal victory for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and environmentalists, who protested for months against the pipeline. Oil started flowing through it earlier this month. The tribe fears that the pipeline, which crosses the Missouri River just upstream of its reservation, could contaminate its drinking water and sacred lands.

Texans Concerned Over Pipeline CEO Kelcy Warren's Role On Parks & Wildlife Commission

Apr 12, 2017
Gus Contreras / KERA News

Texas senators met Wednesday morning to consider confirming Kelcy Warren, the CEO of the Dallas-based company building the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline, to the state’s Parks and Wildlife Commission

A federal judge has denied a request by the Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River tribes to halt construction of the final piece of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The Dakota Access Pipeline's route takes it over four states and nearly 1,200 miles, from the Bakken oil fields in northwestern North Dakota through South Dakota, Iowa and down to a terminal in Illinois.

But one Missouri River crossing just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota has become the focal point of a fight over how the pipeline's route was analyzed and approved by the federal government.

With the Dakota Access Pipeline now cleared to cross under a reservoir in the Missouri River, one of the two Native American tribes fighting the pipeline has filed a legal challenge to the plan, according to the Associated Press.

Updated at 4:45 p.m. ET

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has granted an easement allowing the Dakota Access Pipeline to cross under the Missouri River north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, paving the way for construction of the final 1.5 miles of the nearly 1,200-mile pipeline.

In doing so, the Army cut short its environmental impact assessment and the public comment period associated with it.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

Former Gov. Rick Perry has resigned from the board of Dallas pipeline company Energy Transfer Partners as he prepares to become energy secretary under President-elect Donald Trump. 

Rick Perry's Energy Legacy Is More Complicated Than You Think

Dec 13, 2016
Abby Livingston / Texas Tribune

As he said farewell to the Texas Legislature in January 2015, Rick Perry couldn’t help but reflect on how energy technology and policy had transformed the state’s landscape — and fueled its economy — during his record 14 years as governor. 

Police and demonstrators opposed to the Dakota Access Pipeline clashed overnight on a bridge that has been a flashpoint in the ongoing protests.

"Police say protesters set fires in the area Sunday night and threw rocks at officers," Prairie Public Broadcasting's Amy Sisk reported. But an activist said in a live-stream video that projectiles fired from the police side started the fires and that demonstrators, who call themselves water protectors, were trying to extinguish the flames.

Gus Contreras / KERA News

Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners is building a controversial oil pipeline in North Dakota. On Friday night, dozens of demonstrators gathered across the street from Klyde Warren Park - named after CEO Kelcey Warren's son.

Andrew Cullen / Reuters

The company building the four-state Dakota Access pipeline plans to resume construction on private land near Lake Oahe in North Dakota, where protests supporting tribal rights have endured for months.

The statement early Tuesday from Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners comes in the wake of a federal appeals court ruling Sunday allowing construction to resume within 20 miles of the lake. The $3.8 million, 1,200-mile pipeline from North Dakota to Illinois is otherwise largely complete.

In Dallas And Across U.S., Demonstrators Rally Against Dakota Access Pipeline

Sep 14, 2016
Andrew Cullen / Reuters

Protests against the Dakota Access pipeline have been ongoing for weeks, but on Tuesday, rallies across the U.S. and world were held as part of a widespread “Day of Action” denouncing the project from a Dallas-based energy company.