Electoral College | KERA News

Electoral College

Texas electors helped officially send Donald Trump to the White House Monday.

The 38 people in Texas who officially get to pick the next president were also met with hundreds of protesters at the Texas Capitol, though, who were hoping to convince them to vote for someone other than Trump.

Donald J. Trump will be the next president of the United States.

That's been the case since Nov. 8, when Trump won 306 electoral votes, despite losing the national popular vote to Hillary Clinton by nearly 3 million.

And on Monday, the result was ratified by Electoral College voters, who gathered in state capitols across the United States to formally vote for president.

Krystina Martinez / KERA News

Updated: The Electoral College vote today in Texas was, as expected, an overwhelming win for Donald Trump. What wasn't expected was the number of Republican voters who resigned or defected. Four electors quit and were replaced. The final tally was 36 for Trump and one each for Ohio Gov. John Kasich and for fellow Texan Ron Paul.

Electors from the 50 states will convene in their state capitols Monday and cast their votes for president. Republican Donald Trump is assured of a victory, unless there is a massive — and totally unexpected — defection by the electors who are pledged to support him.

Here are five things you should know about the Electoral College:

1. How do you get to be an elector?

Courtesy Photo: Christopher Suprun

Editor's noteThis web story has been edited to reflect the latest reports about Christopher Suprun's background. 

The Electoral College will vote Dec. 19 for the next president. At least two of this state’s electors announced they won’t cast votes for Donald Trump. One resigned as an elector. The other, Christopher Suprun from Dallas, vows that he will vote for someone else.