Elections 2016 | KERA News

Elections 2016

Gerald Daughtery Campaign / YouTube

It’s been an exhausting election season, to say the least. Between three painstaking presidential debates, the ever-changing political hue of Texas (red, blue, purple, etc.), and what we can only imagine extended relatives everywhere are saying on Facebook, many of us are running on fumes.

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Voters continued to turn out in record-breaking numbers across North Texas and the state on the second day of early voting Tuesday.

Dallas County Sees Cluster Of Competitive Texas House Races

Oct 26, 2016
Bob Daemmrich, Marjorie Kamys Cotera, campaign website and Facebook pages

Four Republican state representatives in Dallas County hope their legislative records will help them fend off Democratic challenges in what could be some of November’s closest state legislative races.

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All 36 of Texas’ congressional seats are on the ballot this fall, but only one of those races is considered truly competitive. The vast majority of state House and Senate races aren’t particularly competitive, either. One big reason: A lot of the state's districts are drawn to give one party or the other a big majority.

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A record-breaking number of voters cast their ballots early across Texas. That's good news for democracy, but the high turnout on opening day of early voting wasn't without incident, including long lines throughout the state, inaccurate voter ID signs and machine snafus in Denton County. 

In case you needed more evidence of the toll this divisive campaign is taking on America, a new survey says more than a third of social media users are "worn out" by the amount of political content they encounter.

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North Texas shattered first-day early voting records on Monday. Voting in Dallas County surged 78 percent over 2012's number. Tarrant jumped 42 percent. Collin nearly doubled its total four years ago.

In Some Texas Counties, Long Lines Complicate Early Voting

Oct 25, 2016
Michael Stravato for The Texas Tribune

Avoiding long lines on Election Day is supposed to be one of the benefits of voting early, but on the first official day to cast ballots in Texas, some parts of the state reported long waits — sometimes hours — along with a few other snafus.

How Secure Is Electronic Voting In Texas?

Oct 25, 2016
Al Ortiz / Houston Public Media

With talk of rigging and stolen elections, people are more concerned than usual about whether their vote will count. 

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Five stories that have North Texas talking: Nina Pham settles her lawsuit against Texas Health Resources; Fort Worth Symphony cancels concerts through Dec. 31; students rate an SMU professor as one of the best in the country; and more.

A Lesson On Polls

Oct 24, 2016
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An ABC News poll released Sunday shows Hillary Clinton has a double-digit lead over Donald Trump. But that doesn’t guarantee those results will be duplicated on Election Day.

Voting Has Started, And Electionland Is On The Case

Oct 24, 2016
Andrew Burton / Getty Images

Election Day is still a few weeks away, but some Americans are already casting ballots. About 20 states and the District of Columbia have early voting programs, several of which have already begun. It’s estimated that about one-third of the country will have voted by the time polls open on Nov. 8.

More than 35 million eligible voters in the U.S. — about one in six — have a disability. And in the last presidential election, almost a third of voters with disabilities reported having trouble casting their ballots — whether it was getting into the polling place, reading the ballot, or struggling with a machine.

Despite some improvements, many of these voters are expected to face similar problems again this year.

Why Is Texas So Red, And How Did It Get That Way?

Oct 24, 2016
JORGE SANHUEZA-LYON / KUT

We all know Texas is a red state. Democrats haven't won a statewide election since 1994, and Republicans have carried the state in every presidential election since 1976.

From the outset, Democrats needed a very big-wave election to get to the 30 seats they need to win back control of the House. Then, a video of Donald Trump surfaced showing the GOP nominee making lewd comments, and later multiple women accused him of groping them. That left some wondering if these scandals could trigger that wave.

But that simply hasn't happened.

Texas To Russian Official: Stay Out Of Our Polling Places

Oct 21, 2016
Consulate General of the Russian Federation

Texas Secretary of State Carlos Cascos has said no to Russian officials’ request to watch Texans vote, according to correspondence obtained by The Texas Tribune.

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In the past week, Donald Trump has suggested the United States election system is rigged as he continues sliding in the polls. The accusation, along with news of a potential voter fraud investigation in Tarrant County, has raised questions about the security of our elections process. 

Wooing Latino Voters On The Border In The Year Of Trump

Oct 21, 2016

Arizona's Santa Cruz County on the Mexican border is what Republican operative Sergio Arellano jokingly calls "Democrat heaven." Only 16 percent of voters are registered as Republicans. More than 80 percent of the population is Latino.

Arellano has been trying to lure more of these voters to the GOP, but this campaign season has been tricky.

"What we encounter on the grass-roots is, 'Republicans are racist. Republicans and Trump want to deport everybody, want to build the wall,'" said Arellano.

A Presidential Historian On The Presidential Debate

Oct 20, 2016
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Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump squared off in the last president debate Wednesday night. On Think, Krys Boyd recapped the night with presidential historian Jon Meacham.

In front of an exuberant crowd Thursday in Delaware, Ohio, Donald Trump again addressed whether he would accept the outcome of the November election.

"Ladies and gentleman I want to make a major announcement today," Trump said, continuing, "I would like to promise and pledge to all of my voters and supporters, and to all of the people of the United States, that I will totally accept the results of this great and historic presidential election ..."

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump had one job in his third and final debate with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton: break out.

He needed to break out from the narrative that is fast enveloping his campaign — the way evening overtakes the late afternoon.

He needed a breakout performance showing himself to be disciplined and knowledgeable enough to be president.

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Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton square off tonight in the third and last presidential debate. Follow along as we hear reactions and commentary from fellow Texans. Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter with #TXDecides.

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Three weeks out from Election Day, Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate Wednesday night at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Psy-ops in the guest box continues at the third and final presidential debate.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are both using guest tickets in a calculated effort to rattle their rivals, or at least send a signal to voters watching on TV.

The in-your-face guest list includes two billionaire critics of Trump, the mother of a Benghazi victim, and President Obama's Kenya-born half-brother.

The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is on Wednesday at 9 p.m. ET. It's the last chance either candidate will have to make a closing argument before tens of millions of voters.

It follows yet another unprecedented week in the campaign, in which Trump has repeatedly questioned the legitimacy of the election, predicting that it will be stolen from him through media bias and massive voter fraud.

How would Donald Trump "drain the swamp" in Washington as he puts it? Two words: term limits.

At a rally in Colorado Springs, Colo., Tuesday, Trump said if elected in November he will "push for a constitutional amendment to impose term limits on all members of Congress."

How Big Is Hillary Clinton's Historic Ad Buy In Texas?

Oct 18, 2016
Michael Stravato for The Texas Tribune

Democrat Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign surprised many Monday when it announced it was planning to advertise in ruby red Texas before Election Day. 

Well, maybe.

Democrats have fantasized about turning Texas blue for a long time. And Hillary Clinton sees a slight opportunity to do that.

Let's make one thing clear: Three weeks out from this election, Hillary Clinton is winning — and it's not close.

Yes, people still have to vote, but if Democratic groups come out — and the Trump scorched-earth campaign is more like a white flag than an actual strategy — Hillary Clinton will be the next president of the United States unless something drastic changes between now and Election Day.

The month of October has been about as bad as could be for Trump. Let's recap. There was:

- The leaked audio of Trump's comments bragging about kissing and groping women,

Donald Trump is warning that the election will be rigged. He has precisely zero evidence to back up that claim. But he has a remarkably receptive audience.

Around 30 percent of Americans have "little or no confidence" that votes will be counted accurately — and Trump's voters are far less confident about that than Clinton's.

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