Ebola

When It Came To Ebola, Control Eluded Texas Leaders

Oct 22, 2014
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / The Texas Tribune

When the Ebola virus first arrived in Texas, Gov. Rick Perry greeted the grave news with trademark swagger.

“There is no place in the world, I will suggest to you, that has better professionals, better ability to address this, than in Texas,” he said at a hastily called press conference, one day after Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan tested positive for Ebola while in isolation at a Dallas hospital.

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There is no drug to treat Ebola that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. But there are companies selling products claiming to do just that.

A health care worker who had self-quarantined herself aboard a Carnival Cruise Lines ship has tested negative for Ebola and was allowed to disembark with the rest of the passengers in Galveston, Texas, on Sunday.

In a statement, the Galveston County Health Authority said it had determined "there is no evidence of a public health threat to cruise passengers or to Galveston county."

In a full-page letter published in Sunday's Dallas Morning News, Barclay Berdan, the CEO of the company that owns Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, said the hospital was "deeply sorry" for missing the ebola diagnosis of Thomas Eric Duncan.

How many times do top officials have to say that the Ebola virus is not airborne?

A lot, apparently.

Here is President Obama Thursday: "This is not an airborne disease. It is not easy to catch."

And the day before: "It is not like the flu. It is not airborne."

And Friday, a reporter asked the inevitable question about airborne Ebola when Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, held a press briefing about nurse Nina Pham's transfer to the National Institute of Health.

Texas Tribune livestream

[We will update this post throughout the day.] A cruise ship with a Dallas health care worker aboard who's being monitored for signs of Ebola did not receive clearance to dock in Cozumel, Mexico.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

On Monday, early voting begins in Texas.  If you haven’t heard a lot about it, that might be because the evolving Ebola crisis in Dallas has overwhelmed news coverage -- even in one campaign where the Ebola response seems to be the issue.

Texas Health Resources / Twitter

Dozens of Dallas health care workers who had contact with the man who died from the Ebola virus have been asked to sign legal documents in which they'll agree to stay home.

First there was ISIS. Now there's Ebola.

The Ebola health crisis is the latest global issue to become a fixture this campaign season, spilling into debates, campaign rhetoric — and even a few ads.

Political arguments about Ebola can roughly be divided into three groups.

Democrats argue that budget-cutting Republicans have deprived the government of the resources it needs to keep Americans safe from the threat of Ebola. That's the argument Democratic Sen. Mark Udall of Colorado made at a recent debate.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Amber Vinson, the second Dallas nurse to contract Ebola, lives in the Village Apartments, just a couple miles south of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.  It’s the biggest apartment complex in Dallas, with more than 10,000 tenants.

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