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Ebola

When It Came To Ebola, Control Eluded Texas Leaders

Oct 22, 2014
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / The Texas Tribune

When the Ebola virus first arrived in Texas, Gov. Rick Perry greeted the grave news with trademark swagger.

“There is no place in the world, I will suggest to you, that has better professionals, better ability to address this, than in Texas,” he said at a hastily called press conference, one day after Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan tested positive for Ebola while in isolation at a Dallas hospital.

Emory University Hospital/YouTube

Federal health officials on Monday issued new guidelines to promote head-to-toe protection for health workers treating Ebola patients.

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There is no drug to treat Ebola that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. But there are companies selling products claiming to do just that.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

Yesterday was the first Sunday at Our Lady of Fatima Church since Nina Pham, the first nurse to become infected with the Ebola virus, was transferred from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital to Maryland for continued treatment.

A health care worker who had self-quarantined herself aboard a Carnival Cruise Lines ship has tested negative for Ebola and was allowed to disembark with the rest of the passengers in Galveston, Texas, on Sunday.

In a statement, the Galveston County Health Authority said it had determined "there is no evidence of a public health threat to cruise passengers or to Galveston county."

In a full-page letter published in Sunday's Dallas Morning News, Barclay Berdan, the CEO of the company that owns Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, said the hospital was "deeply sorry" for missing the ebola diagnosis of Thomas Eric Duncan.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Frontline, which airs on PBS and KERA-TV (Channel 13), takes a closer look at how Ebola spread through Africa with this interactive map.

How many times do top officials have to say that the Ebola virus is not airborne?

A lot, apparently.

Here is President Obama Thursday: "This is not an airborne disease. It is not easy to catch."

And the day before: "It is not like the flu. It is not airborne."

And Friday, a reporter asked the inevitable question about airborne Ebola when Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, held a press briefing about nurse Nina Pham's transfer to the National Institute of Health.

Texas Tribune livestream

[We will update this post throughout the day.] A cruise ship with a Dallas health care worker aboard who's being monitored for signs of Ebola did not receive clearance to dock in Cozumel, Mexico.

YouTube/Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital

On Thursday, Nina Pham departed Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital for the National Institutes of Health in Maryland. Before she left, her physician, Dr. Gary Weinstein, recorded a conversation with her. Pham asked Presbyterian to share the video. Watch it below.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

On Monday, early voting begins in Texas.  If you haven’t heard a lot about it, that might be because the evolving Ebola crisis in Dallas has overwhelmed news coverage -- even in one campaign where the Ebola response seems to be the issue.

Texas Health Resources / Twitter

Dozens of Dallas health care workers who had contact with the man who died from the Ebola virus have been asked to sign legal documents in which they'll agree to stay home.

First there was ISIS. Now there's Ebola.

The Ebola health crisis is the latest global issue to become a fixture this campaign season, spilling into debates, campaign rhetoric — and even a few ads.

Political arguments about Ebola can roughly be divided into three groups.

Democrats argue that budget-cutting Republicans have deprived the government of the resources it needs to keep Americans safe from the threat of Ebola. That's the argument Democratic Sen. Mark Udall of Colorado made at a recent debate.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

Amber Vinson, the second Dallas nurse to contract Ebola, lives in the Village Apartments, just a couple miles south of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.  It’s the biggest apartment complex in Dallas, with more than 10,000 tenants.

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After two of the nurses who treated Thomas Eric Duncan became sick with Ebola, their colleagues across the state are expressing concerns about preparation for handling Ebola. 

Sana Syed / City of Dallas

There’s a four-legged character in this Ebola drama who’s captured a lot of hearts – Nina Pham’s dog, Bentley. Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings has vowed that the dog will be cared for. We know a lot about how the Ebola virus is spread in humans, but what about the virus and dogs? 

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As the medical community fights to contain Ebola, the virus is also challenging another field: the law. Today on Think, Krys Boyd asked a panel of attorneys about some of the legal questions surrounding Ebola.

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[We will update this post throughout the day.] Federal health officials say they've identified 76 hospital workers who may have been exposed to the first Ebola patient in Dallas.

Samaritan's Purse

A Dallas nurse who has Ebola has been given plasma to fight the virus taken from the blood of a doctor who beat the disease.

Texas Health Resources

About 70 staff members at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital were involved in the care of Thomas Eric Duncan after he was hospitalized, according to medical records his family provided to The Associated Press.

City of Dallas/Animal Services / Twitter/@dallasshelter

What will happen to the dog of Nina Pham, the Dallas nurse who contracted the Ebola virus?

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KERA has confirmed that the nurse who’s tested positive for Ebola is Nina Pham, a 26-year-old graduate of Texas Christian University who also attended Nolan Catholic High School in Fort Worth.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

It was business as usual Monday morning in the East Dallas neighborhood where the first patient to contract Ebola in the U.S. lives.

Lauren Silverman / KERA News

[We will update this post throughout the day.]  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed Sunday afternoon that the health care worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas has tested positive for the Ebola virus. It is the first known case of Ebola being contracted in the U.S.

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Saymendy Lloyd, a friend of the woman who planned to marry Thomas Duncan, spoke on behalf of the family of the Dallas Ebola patient during a press conference Friday afternoon. 

Flickr / americannurseproject

The experimental drug Brincidofovir was administered to the Dallas Ebola patient as soon as it possibly could, Texas Health Presbyterian officials said Thursday afternoon.

Bill Zeeble / KERA News

A prayer vigil planned for Thomas Eric Duncan became a memorial service Wednesday night after it was announced he had died from the Ebola virus. Wilshire Baptist Church in East Dallas was filled with about a hundred mourners who had never met Duncan. 

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After two weeks of fearful medical news, Texas got some relief today. A sheriff’s deputy tested negative for Ebola. And no one else is showing symptoms.

Stella M. Chávez / KERA News

A little more than two weeks ago when Thomas Eric Duncan arrived in the U.S., he stayed at his girlfriend’s apartment in Dallas' Vickery Meadow neighborhood. Today, the ethnically diverse community of immigrants and refugees in the neighborhood learned of his death by word of mouth and watching TV.

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[We will update this story throughout the day.]  Thomas Duncan, the Dallas Ebola patient, died shortly before 8 a.m. Meanwhile, a patient has been sent to Texas Health Presbyterian after falling ill and reporting possible Ebola exposure.

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